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having reinstalled slackware in order to get a lot of software I didn't install the first time around, when I login, it now asks me for a root disk.... I ...
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  1. #1
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    root disk on startup....


    having reinstalled slackware in order to get a lot of software I didn't install the first time around, when I login, it now asks me for a root disk.... I don't remember making one, and I'm not sure what one is, for that matter. It sends the computer into a Kernel panic everytime I try to bypasas it. I don't know what to do.

    thanks much.

  2. #2
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    The root disk is the second diskette needed to install Slackware Linux. This disk holds the setup program and all of the necessary utilities to get Slackware up and running on your system. You create the root disk in the same manner as the boot disk. That is, pick an image and dump it to a floppy. The list below explains the different root disk images available.
    I believe you can get them from any Slackware mirror.
    http://public.ftp.planetmirror.com/p...ent/bootdisks/
    ftp://ftp.slackware-brasil.com.br/sl...ent/bootdisks/
    etc..

  3. #3
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    err... which one of those do I need?

  4. #4
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    color.gz The menu-based color installation disk for 1.44 meg drives Most users should use this rootdisk.

    text.gz The terminal-based installation disk for 1.44 meg drives. should use color.gz, but a few people have reported problems with it on their system. If color.gz doesn't work on your system, try text.gz.

    umsdos.gz A version of the color.gz disk for installing with the UMSDOS filesystem, which allows you to install Linux onto a directory of an MS-DOS filesystem.
    Check out their main page man...

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