Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 8 of 8
No matter what I try to do, slackware 10 always boots me to the command line, never to a graphical login manager. Is there just no graphical logon and do ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    34

    Slack 10 - booting to command line


    No matter what I try to do, slackware 10 always boots me to the command line, never to a graphical login manager.

    Is there just no graphical logon and do I have to login and then type startx each time, or is there something I can do to fix it?

    I've edited inittab to boot in mode 5, but that doesn't do anything for me. And I tried the xorc config program, but that just made things screw up on me seeing as I have no idea what my monitor's specifications are other than that it's 17".

    Help anyone? I'll give you a cookie .

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    826

    Re: Slack 10 - booting to command line

    Quote Originally Posted by iXmIo
    I've edited inittab to boot in mode 5, but that doesn't do anything for me.
    i thought it was 4. maybe i'm wrong.

  3. #3
    Linux Guru sarumont's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    /dev/urandom
    Posts
    3,682

    Re: Slack 10 - booting to command line

    Quote Originally Posted by sether
    Quote Originally Posted by iXmIo
    I've edited inittab to boot in mode 5, but that doesn't do anything for me.
    i thought it was 4. maybe i'm wrong.
    It's *typically* runlevel 5 for multi-user graphical, but it *is* 4 in slack.
    "Time is an illusion. Lunchtime, doubly so."
    ~Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

  4. $spacer_open
    $spacer_close
  5. #4
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    34
    Bleh, now you guys are just making me feel dumb =P.

    I should have tried that before...but I'll check it out and see if it works.

    EDIT: Ok, that worked like a charm...now I have to find out how to configure my network cards so I can access the internet, and how to add another user.

  6. #5
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    34
    Ok, I managed to get the network card up and add a user (had to do it through kde, because I'm not command savvy yet), but the user can't reboot from gnome, only log out, and the graphical login manager won't let me reboot from it...so I either have to log in as root to reboot, or use su in the terminal and give the reboot command. Any way around that?

    And is there a way to set up my nVidia card? I tried to install the drivers but it said it was the wrong kernel or some such. So it recompiled something by itself but I'm still not able to get a resolution higher than 1024x768, and I usually use either 1156x854 (or whatever that one is) or 1280x1024. And I can't play Quake 3 (grr) because it's using my onboard video card that doesn't support opengl.

    Thinking it might be easier just to install Mandrake 10 again, but Slack 10 is a whole lot faster, and that's what I'm looking for =/. Damn my celeron coppermine to hell.

  7. #6
    Linux User zba78's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Birmingham, England
    Posts
    335
    To be able to select resolution of 1280x1024 (or whatever you want) you need to add (as root)the resolution you need to the "Screen" Section of your /etc/X11/xorg.conf file.

    You should have something that looks like this:
    Code:
    Section "Screen"
    	Identifier "Screen0"
    	Device     "Videocard0"
    	Monitor     "Monitor0"
    	DefaultDepth      24
    	SubSection "Display"
    		Viewport  0 0
    		Depth     24
    		Modes    "1024x768" "800x600" "640x480"
    	EndSubSection
    EndSection
    You need to add your required resolution to the line that says Modes. eg mie looks like this:
    Code:
    Section "Screen"
    	Identifier "Screen0"
    	Device     "Videocard0"
    	Monitor     "Monitor0"
    	DefaultDepth      24
    	SubSection "Display"
    		Viewport  0 0
    		Depth     24
    		Modes    "1280x1024" "1024x768" "800x600" "640x480"
    	EndSubSection
    EndSection
    That should allow you to run higher resolutions
    Ubuntu Jaunty :: Arch Linux (current) :: Acer Aspire 1692WMLi

  8. #7
    Linux Guru sarumont's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    /dev/urandom
    Posts
    3,682
    And to allow the user to reboot, you could configure sudo to allow that user to run the shutdown command as root (the actual command checks to make sure you are root). Then you could change the shortcut in the gnome menu to be 'sudo shutdown -r now'. Check out man sudo and man visudo for info on how to do this.
    "Time is an illusion. Lunchtime, doubly so."
    ~Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

  9. #8
    Linux User
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    256
    Quote Originally Posted by iXmIo
    And is there a way to set up my nVidia card? I tried to install the drivers but it said it was the wrong kernel or some such. So it recompiled something by itself but I'm still not able to get a resolution higher than 1024x768, and I usually use either 1156x854 (or whatever that one is) or 1280x1024. And I can't play Quake 3 (grr) because it's using my onboard video card that doesn't support opengl.
    Are you installing the "nvidia" driver from www.nvidia.com ? That one works for me.

    I might have had to pass the path of my header source to the driver (example: ./nvidia --include-headers=/some/path )

    Use the flag "--help" on the script to figure out what the flag is. If the output is too long, do

    $ ./script --help | less

    and that will pipe the output to the program "less" so you can scroll the output up and down.

    good luck
    --monkey

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •