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I agree.. as much as I don't want to, I do. I am here to learn, that's why I put it on a secondary box, this way if I screw ...
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  1. #11
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    I agree.. as much as I don't want to, I do. I am here to learn, that's why I put it on a secondary box, this way if I screw up, the world has not come to an end.

    I know exactly what you mean when you say "It helps to know how things work if you want to fix things." My '89 Bonneville has quite the list of problems, and I wouldn't dive into her, without the proper instructions, parts, and tools. I guess I hadn't applied what I already know, but from now on, I will make a point to, that's for sure .

    As a side note, if you want the original file back read up on the tar command and find your slackware CD. You might want to do a man man as well. There are a lot of resources on your local machine that are holding the anwsers.
    What do you mean for the "read up on tar command." "You might want to do a man man"

    Sorry for my ignorance.. I still don't know a whole lot yet.


    -justin

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by opensourceguy
    What do you mean for the "read up on tar command." "You might want to do a man man"
    The man (manual) pages are a great source of info on almost everything on the system. Doing a man on man (typing 'man man' at the pompt) will give you the man page for the man command. By reading up on tar I meant to read the man page on tar. You see in Slackware all the packages are tarballs (compressed tar files)... in this case compressed with gzip (not compress). Tarballs usually have the extension .tar.gz (or .tar.bz2), but the Slackware extenstion for the packages is a .tgz (which is short for .tar.gz). So all you have to do is extract the xorg package (tarball) with the xorg.conf file in it and copy it into /etc/X11

    $ grep xorg.conf /var/log/packages/*
    $ tar -xvzf <tar file from CD listed in grep results>
    $ cd etc/X11/
    $ su
    # cp /etc/X11/xorg.conf /etc/X11/xorg.conf.bak
    # cp xorg.conf /etc/X11/xorg.conf
    # exit
    $ startx (see if it works)

    and that is it. I don't know if you are familiar with all those commands, but again the man pages will explain all about them.

  3. #13
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    Well.. I searched my Slack cd's, and I can't find ANYTHING that remotly resemebles anything.. I searched each file anyways, and none of them had anything about xorg.conf. So, I thought I should try to boot from my xorg.conf.bak file.. but that just made xorg.conf and xorg.conf.bak the EXACT same file.

    So, what's left to do? Reinstall slack? Is it possible if I reinstall it, and don't do any partitioning, or formatting that I won't lose any of my installed files? Or any of my saved files?


    -justin

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  5. #14
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    what happens when you run the command xorgconfig as root? And manually enter in all of the commands? Another way would be to set the permissions of /etc/X11 to let anyone have write access, then use a live cd that works well and copy that xorg.conf to the slack xorg.conf, then boot into slack? Maybe worth a try, use Slax live cd since it is a slackware live

  6. #15
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    I can run xorgconfig just fine.. but what happens is it comes back and says "you can't run this depth [16] on this driver" and if I put it at 8bit, I get a f'd up screen. I tried every combination, but nothing has worked.

    I'll try the Slax, that sounds like it should work .


    -justin

  7. #16
    Linux Engineer adrenaline's Avatar
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    Since your new xorg file is the same as xorg.bak can you just start over by re-editing the new xorg file?

  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by opensourceguy
    I can run xorgconfig just fine.. but what happens is it comes back and says "you can't run this depth [16] on this driver" and if I put it at 8bit, I get a f'd up screen. I tried every combination, but nothing has worked.

    I'll try the Slax, that sounds like it should work .-justin
    Use xorgconfig to generate the default file.

    Then manually edit the video driver section.

    What is the name of your graphics card? "Voodoo3"?

    Did you try the driver tdfx?

    Right from the man page "The tdfx driver supports Voodoo Banshee, Voodoo3, Voodoo4 and Voodoo5 cards."
    --monkey

  9. #18
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    Oh man! Monkey, you are DA MAN!!! That was the trick! I am happy to report, I am making this post in slack, in KDE .

    Thanks guys for all your help! I have learned a lot already.


    -justin

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