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I'm trying to install swaret1.6.3 in Slackware 13.0. This is my first time doing this, so I'm stuck. I went through: makdir /home/username/src done Next, cd to /home/username/src - done ...
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  1. #1
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    Unhappy CD to what directory? Installation confusion.


    I'm trying to install swaret1.6.3 in Slackware 13.0. This is my first time doing this, so I'm stuck.
    I went through: makdir /home/username/src done
    Next, cd to /home/username/src - done
    ls to see if the file is present. Console didn't tell me anything, but it's listed in the file manager now, so it's there.
    Next I did tar -zxvf <filename>
    Here's the results displayed on console:
    bash-3.1# tar -zxvf /home/sandy/src/swaret-1.6.3-noarch-2gds.tgz
    ./
    usr/
    usr/src/
    usr/src/slackbuilds/
    usr/src/slackbuilds/swaret-1.6.3/
    usr/src/slackbuilds/swaret-1.6.3/swaret-1.6.3-newext-fix.diff
    usr/src/slackbuilds/swaret-1.6.3/slack-required
    usr/src/slackbuilds/swaret-1.6.3/swaret.SlackBuild
    usr/src/slackbuilds/swaret-1.6.3/swaret-1.6.3-depcheck-fix.diff
    usr/src/slackbuilds/swaret-1.6.3/slack-desc
    usr/doc/
    usr/doc/swaret-1.6.3/
    usr/doc/swaret-1.6.3/HELP
    usr/doc/swaret-1.6.3/README
    usr/doc/swaret-1.6.3/ChangeLog
    usr/doc/swaret-1.6.3/FAQ
    usr/doc/swaret-1.6.3/LICENSE
    usr/doc/swaret-1.6.3/swaret.conf
    usr/doc/swaret-1.6.3/TODO
    usr/doc/swaret-1.6.3/HOW-TO-USE-SWARET/
    usr/doc/swaret-1.6.3/HOW-TO-USE-SWARET/htus.ENGLISH
    usr/doc/swaret-1.6.3/HOW-TO-USE-SWARET/htus.POLISH
    usr/man/
    usr/man/man5/
    usr/man/man5/swaret.conf.5.gz
    usr/man/man8/
    usr/man/man8/swaret.8.gz
    usr/sbin/
    usr/sbin/swaret
    usr/share/
    usr/share/swaret-1.6.3/
    usr/share/swaret-1.6.3/swaret.lang.ARABIC
    usr/share/swaret-1.6.3/swaret.lang.DANSK
    usr/share/swaret-1.6.3/swaret.lang.POLISH
    usr/share/swaret-1.6.3/swaret.lang.ESPANOL
    usr/share/swaret-1.6.3/swaret.lang.MALAY
    usr/share/swaret-1.6.3/swaret.lang.FRANCAIS
    usr/share/swaret-1.6.3/swaret.lang.ENGLISH
    usr/share/swaret-1.6.3/swaret.lang.ITALIANO
    usr/share/swaret-1.6.3/swaret.lang.LITHUANIAN
    usr/share/swaret-1.6.3/swaret.lang.HUNGARIAN
    usr/share/swaret-1.6.3/swaret.lang.CZECH
    usr/share/swaret-1.6.3/swaret.lang.SVENSKA
    usr/share/swaret-1.6.3/swaret.lang.RUSSIAN.koi8r
    usr/share/swaret-1.6.3/swaret.lang.NORSK
    usr/share/swaret-1.6.3/swaret.lang.RUSSIAN.cp1251
    usr/share/swaret-1.6.3/swaret.lang.DEUTSCH
    usr/share/swaret-1.6.3/swaret.lang.SUOMI
    usr/share/swaret-1.6.3/swaret.lang.PORTUGUES
    usr/share/swaret-1.6.3/swaret.lang.NEDERLANDS
    usr/share/swaret-1.6.3/swaret.lang.SLOVAK
    usr/share/swaret-1.6.3/swaret.lang.PORTUGUES_BR
    usr/share/swaret-1.6.3/swaret.lang.CATALA
    usr/share/swaret-1.6.3/swaret.lang.TURKISH
    usr/share/swaret-1.6.3/swaret.lang.ENGLISH_GB
    usr/share/swaret-1.6.3/swaret.lang.ESPANOL_MX
    usr/share/swaret-1.6.3/swaret.lang.BULGARIAN
    install/
    install/slack-required
    install/doinst.sh
    install/slack-desc
    etc/
    etc/swaret.conf.new
    bash-3.1# ls
    etc slapt-get-0.10.2f-i386-1.tgz usr
    firefox-3.6.7bg-i686-1gds.txz smart-1.2-i486-1gds.txz
    install swaret-1.6.3-noarch-2gds.tgz
    bash-3.1#
    The instructions tell me that "you should now have a new directory, containing all of the source files. To confirm it exists, and to get its name, use the 'ls" command.
    As you can see above, I did the ls command, and got the results:

    bash-3.1# ls
    etc slapt-get-0.10.2f-i386-1.tgz usr
    firefox-3.6.7bg-i686-1gds.txz smart-1.2-i486-1gds.txz
    install swaret-1.6.3-noarch-2gds.tgz
    bash-3.1#
    Next it says we now need to go into the new directory, so use the cd command. Here's where I'm stuck; I don't understand. What directory am I supposed to cd to? Out of that stuff above, what directory am I supposed to cd to? A little help here. I don't have a clue how to read this!
    What new directory? Where does it tell me what the new directory is?

  2. #2
    oz
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    Welcome to the forums!

    Did you try installing it with pkgtool, or installpkg?

    The Slackware Linux Project: Configuration Help
    oz

  3. #3
    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
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    It looks like you downloaded a precompiled package, not the source code, so as Ozar said, it can be installed normally with Slackware's package tools.

    Buuut, the last swaret release was 2006. I would not bet on that package being compatible with Slackware 13.

    In fact, looking around, there is this thread which suggests swaret does not work with Slackware 13.0

  4. #4
    oz
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    Quote Originally Posted by reed9 View Post
    Buuut, the last swaret release was 2006. I would not bet on that package being compatible with Slackware 13.
    Ah, that would explain why there wasn't a package for it at LinuxPackages.net, where I used to find lots of my Slackware packages. Fours years old is getting really long in the tooth for a Linux package. Sounds like the developer has totally abandoned it the project.

    I think slackpkg is what lots of Slackers use now, but I've never tried it.
    oz

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    Thanks to both of you. That helped. As you can see, I'm really new to this, but game. I'm not collge trained, just learning as I go along.
    I got the package from Slackpack in Bulgaria, and it said the package was created for Slackware 13.0. I'd say it does not work with 13.0 as suggested in the above thread.
    I'll try pkgtool.

  6. #6
    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sandlynx View Post
    Thanks to both of you. That helped. As you can see, I'm really new to this, but game. I'm not collge trained, just learning as I go along.
    I got the package from Slackpack in Bulgaria, and it said the package was created for Slackware 13.0. I'd say it does not work with 13.0 as suggested in the above thread.
    I'll try pkgtool.
    Actually, let me retract what I said. According to Slackpack, the packager has patched swaret to work with Slackware 13.0. So while the original developer seems to have abandoned the project, it continues yet.

    So you should give it a whirl and install it it using installpkg.

    Code:
    su -c 'installpkg /home/sandy/src/swaret-1.6.3-noarch-2gds.tgz'

  7. #7
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    reed,
    I see you have a "-c" option, but I don't see that option listed in Slackware Essentials book under Slackware Package Management. What is the "-c" option? Wouldn't I want to use the "-m" option?
    OK, I"ll give it a try.

  8. #8
    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
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    su(1): run shell with substitute user/group IDs - Linux man page

    The -c flag is to run a command with root privileges.

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    "Substitute user"? I have root privileges. The purpose to this would be?: "The given home directory will be used as the root of the new filesystem which the user is actually logged into."?
    Thanks for your help. I'll get this all together some day. RTFM.

  10. #10
    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
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    You can use su to run a command as a different user. Much of the time, you do this to run a command as root. Or just log in to the shell as root
    Code:
    su -
    Run your commands and then exit.

    But unless you need to do a lot of stuff as root, it's generally preferred not to log in as such. The above runs just the one command as root. Some distros, notably Ubuntu, utilize sudo and disable the root account altogether.

    The assumption is of course that you have a user account separate from root and are running as the user. It's not recommended to run your system as root.

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