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I'm running Slackware 13.0 and want to upgrade to the newest version of SeaMonkey. I currently have SeaMonkey 1.1.17 and want to upgrade to seamonkey-2.0.7.tar.bz2. Do I have to first ...
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  1. #1
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    Installing newest version of Seamonkey, uninstall old first?


    I'm running Slackware 13.0 and want to upgrade to the newest version of SeaMonkey. I currently have SeaMonkey 1.1.17 and want to upgrade to seamonkey-2.0.7.tar.bz2.
    Do I have to first uninstall the old version before installing the newest version?

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer Freston's Avatar
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    You can put both versions side by side.

    You'll find the directory /usr/lib/seamonkey is a symlink to the directory /usr/lib/seamonkey-version. So you put the new version next to the old one, change the symlinks pointing toward it and decide later if you want to remove the old version.
    Can't tell an OS by it's GUI

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    Thanks,
    How do you change a symlink? There's a lot of this stuff I've never done before (obviously)

  4. #4
    Linux Engineer Freston's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sandlynx
    Thanks,
    How do you change a symlink? There's a lot of this stuff I've never done before (obviously)
    There's a first time for everything

    It needs to be done in two places. The symlink to the directory and the symlink to the binary.

    first put the whole seamonkey-newversion in /usr/lib/

    Code:
    # DIRECTORY
    # Delete the symlink
    rm /usr/lib/seamonkey
    
    # create symlink to new version
    ln -s /usr/lib/seamonkey-newversion /usr/lib/seamonkey

    Code:
    # BINARY
    # Delete the symlink
    rm /usr/bin/seamonkey
    
    # create symlink to new version
    ln -s /usr/lib/seamonkey-newversion/seamonkey /usr/bin/seamonkey
    Can't tell an OS by it's GUI

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    Thanks,
    I've learned more on this forum in the last month than I have on any other forum in the last year. I appreciate it, since I don't have the time nor the bucks to go to college to learn this.

  6. #6
    Linux Enthusiast Mudgen's Avatar
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    You can skip deleting the existing slinks by using "ln -sf". It will overwrite them.

  7. #7
    Linux Engineer Freston's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by greyhairweenie
    You can skip deleting the existing slinks by using "ln -sf". It will overwrite them.
    Thanks!

    Quote Originally Posted by sandlynx
    I've learned more on this forum in the last month than I have on any other forum in the last year.
    That's good to hear

    Well, as you can see, I learn from this site every day. Like you, I don't have time to go to college, but you can learn from just participating on a forum like this. Nobody knows everything, but everyone knows something
    Can't tell an OS by it's GUI

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    And if you want to go more in deep, check the manuals for coreutils and bash.
    Just a friendly tip (that's how I learned ).

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    Thanks to all of you. It's a good thing I didn't rush on installilng SeaMonkey, versiion 2.0.7 since I just saw that there's a newer version out, 2.0.8.

  10. #10
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    keikin2004
    I will be checking on coreutils and bash.

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