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I know I can run kdesu to run apps as root but what if i have an app installed as a different user. I don't want to run it as ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Engineer adrenaline's Avatar
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    running as a different user


    I know I can run kdesu to run apps as root but what if i have an app installed as a different user. I don't want to run it as root I want to run it as a different user.

    Synopsis:
    I am running crossover office with office 2k pro as a school based user. but I wanted to access it as a work based user. I ran kdesu and it accessed it as root but it wanted me to install it as root. I want to just run it not install it for every instance on my machine. Is this even possible?

    Mike
    Some people have told me they don't think a fat penguin really embodies the grace of Linux, which just tells me they have never seen a angry penguin charging at them in excess of 100mph. They'd be a lot more careful about what they say if they had.
    -- Linus Torvalds

  2. #2
    Linux Guru lakerdonald's Avatar
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    Code:
    kdesu --help
    all right there
    -lakerdonald

  3. #3
    Linux Newbie
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    Contrary to popular belief, su does not mean superuser. It means switch user.
    Using the su command, you can give a terminal or console any users privilege. When you issue the su command without a username, the shell assumes root. However, you can also:
    Code:
    james@stargate~$su donna
    Password:
    donna@stargate~$
    That terminal now belongs to user donna and any command will be issued with her privileges.
    OH NOOOOO!!!!!! You did it the way I said?

  4. #4
    Linux Engineer adrenaline's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by U-Turn
    Contrary to popular belief, su does not mean superuser. It means switch user.
    Using the su command, you can give a terminal or console any users privilege. When you issue the su command without a username, the shell assumes root. However, you can also:
    Code:
    james@stargate~$su donna
    Password:
    donna@stargate~$
    That terminal now belongs to user donna and any command will be issued with her privileges.
    I realize that, but what I want to run will not run in a command line. So My question is how do I do it if I want to run a gui app?
    Some people have told me they don't think a fat penguin really embodies the grace of Linux, which just tells me they have never seen a angry penguin charging at them in excess of 100mph. They'd be a lot more careful about what they say if they had.
    -- Linus Torvalds

  5. #5
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    Not sure, and I'm sure you tried this, but can you chmod to give it execute priveleges to all users?

  6. #6
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    Sorry. I wasn't thinking. To do what I suggested requires PAM. PAM isn't included in a stock Slackware install. I use Dropline GNOME and therefore have PAM installed.
    OH NOOOOO!!!!!! You did it the way I said?

  7. #7
    Linux Guru lakerdonald's Avatar
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    i told you to rtfm:
    Code:
    kdesu --help
    it says it right there.
    -lakerdonald

  8. #8
    Linux Engineer adrenaline's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lakerdonald
    i told you to rtfm:
    Code:
    kdesu --help
    it says it right there.
    -lakerdonald
    OK, Lakerdonald "stop dropping bricks" I got it! hehe


    kdesu -u <username>
    worked great thanks

    Mike

    Some people have told me they don't think a fat penguin really embodies the grace of Linux, which just tells me they have never seen a angry penguin charging at them in excess of 100mph. They'd be a lot more careful about what they say if they had.
    -- Linus Torvalds

  9. #9
    Linux Guru lakerdonald's Avatar
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    congrats

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