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so i'm running slackware 10, and i would like to be able to create a user that is restricted to its home directory for ftp, as a a max disk ...
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  1. #1
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    Automating user restrictions?


    so i'm running slackware 10, and i would like to be able to create a user that is restricted to its home directory for ftp, as a a max disk quota of 1 gig, has email, and things like that. easy way to automate that? (or even do it....)
    thanks everybody!

  2. #2
    Linux Guru lakerdonald's Avatar
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    what do you mean restricted to his home directory for ftp? do you mean that he can only access his home directory all the time, or only access his home directory when he ftp's in?

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    restricted to his home directory for ftp. (ssh it doesn't matter as i'm just not going to forward the ssh port to that machine), in general i guess. sorry for not making it clear.

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    Linux Guru lakerdonald's Avatar
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    so that when he ftp's in, it will lock him in his /home dir?

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    ya

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    Linux Guru lakerdonald's Avatar
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    try vsftpd, it's fairly secure and relatively easy to configure.

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    what about assigning a disk quota?
    also right now i'm using proftp. switch to vsftpd?

  8. #8
    Linux Guru lakerdonald's Avatar
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    You can also use proftp. A disk quota can be assigned in many different ways, one of which is giving the directory it's own partition. But this is by far not the only way.

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    i don't think a partition will be practical as i will need at least dozens, and need to add them as i go along. another option?

  10. #10
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    linux has quota support built in.

    man quota

    http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Quota.html

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