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So I have a USB drive i want to install slackware on. I have the isos mounted on my machine. Should there be a setup program (like when you boot ...
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  1. #1
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    Installing from a mounted iso


    So I have a USB drive i want to install slackware on. I have the isos mounted on my machine. Should there be a setup program (like when you boot the CD) to start an installation somewhere in the image?

    Actually the reason i want to be able to boot off this USB drive is so i can install Slackware on another machine. Would there be a way to put the iso images on the USB drive and boot from them so that i dont have to install slackware on it?

    (and i dont have a cdrom or floppy drive)

  2. #2
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    that would require a BIOS / system configuration that is capable IN BIOS of booting off a USB device...before that would even work.
    Chicks dig giant mechanized war machines

  3. #3
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    ...which i have

  4. #4
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    put it in the computer and set the bios to boot from usb and turn it on

  5. #5
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    Just saw this post!

    You might want to take a look at how Damn Small Linux's USB booting works and try to copy it. From the top of my head, you'll need to change the ISOLINUX loader to the SYSLINUX loader because most USB drives are formated FAT, whereas CDs are formated ISO9660. Might take some tinkering around, but isn't impossible.

  6. #6
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    Though the post is oldish now, for the record an article which has a fair amount of detail:
    http://www.linuxjournal.com/article/8906

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