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Folks, After clean compiles and install of kernels 2.6.13 and 2.6.14, including filesystems ext3 and reiserfs as modules I keep getting kernel panics. To compile I'm running the standard Slackware ...
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  1. #1
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    Kernel Panic - Slackware 10.2 - kernel 2.6.13 & 14 - mkinitrd for ext3 and reiserfs


    Folks,

    After clean compiles and install of kernels 2.6.13 and 2.6.14, including filesystems ext3 and reiserfs as modules I keep getting kernel panics. To compile I'm running the standard Slackware 10.2 distro, kernel 2.4.31. I've used mkinitrd 1.0.1 just as recommended
    mkinitrd -c -k 2.6.14 -m jbd:ext3 -f ext3 -r /dev/hda1
    and included the
    initrd="/boot/initrd.gz"
    statement in lilo, then run lilo.

    What's wrong?

    Pedro

    +++Fill up your mind with Premium fuel only...+++

  2. #2
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    I was always told to compile resierfs/ext3 into the kernel and not as modules. If you have your boot/root partition as reiserfs/ext3 then I think you MUST compile into the kernel.

  3. #3
    Linux User Krendoshazin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by juvestar15
    I was always told to compile resierfs/ext3 into the kernel and not as modules. If you have your boot/root partition as reiserfs/ext3 then I think you MUST compile into the kernel.
    It's usually custom to compile the filesystem drivers into the kernel, but in the case that the filesystem driver is a module then you'll need an initrd image, this is only needed in cases like having a raid setup or as stated before, having the filesystem driver as a module.
    If you don't have raid, and you compiled the filesystem driver into the kernel (which there's no reason not to) then the need for an initrd image is practically non-existant.

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  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Krendoshazin
    Quote Originally Posted by juvestar15
    I was always told to compile resierfs/ext3 into the kernel and not as modules. If you have your boot/root partition as reiserfs/ext3 then I think you MUST compile into the kernel.
    It's usually custom to compile the filesystem drivers into the kernel, but in the case that the filesystem driver is a module then you'll need an initrd image, this is only needed in cases like having a raid setup or as stated before, having the filesystem driver as a module.
    If you don't have raid, and you compiled the filesystem driver into the kernel (which there's no reason not to) then the need for an initrd image is practically non-existant.
    Thanks for clearing it up, I had no idea about the reasoning behind it.

  6. #5
    Linux Newbie
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    Nice explaination. I was looking for it.

  7. #6
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    I've never needed an initrd , but I should really learn how to create one still

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