Find the answer to your Linux question:
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
i have used both kde and gnome with slackware 10.1 and neither mount my flash drive automatically. i would like this to happen. How do i go about this? thanks ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Linux Enthusiast Weedman's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Tasmania, Australia
    Posts
    640

    automounting my flash drive in slackware 10.1


    i have used both kde and gnome with slackware 10.1 and neither mount my flash drive automatically.

    i would like this to happen. How do i go about this?

    thanks
    weed
    "Time has more than one meaning, and is more than one dimension" - /.unknown
    --Registered Linux user #396583--

  2. #2
    oz
    oz is offline
    forum.guy
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    arch linux
    Posts
    18,733
    If you haven't done so already, you'll need to make an entry for it in the /etc/fstab file. Here's what mine looks like:

    Code:
    /dev/sda1              /mnt/flash    vfat      user,noauto,noatime     0      0

  3. #3
    Linux Enthusiast Weedman's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Tasmania, Australia
    Posts
    640
    just a thought, does "noatime" option disable mounting the device on boot?

    i will try putting that into /etc/fstab to see if it works.

    thanks
    weed

    (edit)= i found out that "noauto" is that. What does 'noatime" do then?
    "Time has more than one meaning, and is more than one dimension" - /.unknown
    --Registered Linux user #396583--

  4. #4
    Linux Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    668
    'noatime' tells the kernel to stop recording file modification timestamps for that file, you'll notice on some distros /var is mounted with 'noatime' to make the writes faster.

    it depends if you want your flash drive handled by the window manager, or handled by a proper automount daemon.

    what ozar stated with the simple /etc/fstab line would be simple enough for you, but if you had the skill you could setup UDEV/Hotplug/AUTOFS, so that every time you plug the pendrive in, hotplug loads the correct module for it,UDEV assigns it '/dev/stick' (in my case) from its UDEV rules, and the automount daemon and AUTOFS assigns it the mountpoint of /mnt/stick

    as soon as the mount isnt being used any more AUTOFS unmounts it..

    cool eh?

    like windows. . my iPod and NFS/SAMBA shares work the same way.

    its definately not as easy as ozars solution though, but its proper hotplug, and you wont have devices quibbling over /dev/sda, /dev/sdb, and static fstab rules to mount them, and making sure you plug them in the right order etc. UDEV and AUTOFS totally negates needing to do any of that.


  5. #5
    Linux Enthusiast Weedman's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Tasmania, Australia
    Posts
    640
    that IS cool!

    im wondering whether i should bother trying to install udev and autofs from source.

    thanks for that
    weed
    "Time has more than one meaning, and is more than one dimension" - /.unknown
    --Registered Linux user #396583--

  6. #6
    Linux Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    The Hot Humid South
    Posts
    602
    Check it out:
    http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Automount.html

    It's not too bad, but might take a few tries. I've read through it but never actually got my hands dirty with this kind of stuff, automount really isn't that important to me.

  7. #7
    Linux Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    668
    Quote Originally Posted by Weedman
    that IS cool!

    im wondering whether i should bother trying to install udev and autofs from source.

    thanks for that
    weed
    from source? NO

    what are you talking about - use the slackware packages, both come with slackware

  8. #8
    Linux Enthusiast Weedman's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Tasmania, Australia
    Posts
    640
    Quote Originally Posted by kern
    from source? NO

    what are you talking about - use the slackware packages, both come with slackware
    lol ok, maybe not this from source.
    "Time has more than one meaning, and is more than one dimension" - /.unknown
    --Registered Linux user #396583--

  9. #9
    Linux Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    668
    Quote Originally Posted by Weedman
    lol ok, maybe not this from source.
    You should learn how to make slackware packages, never,EVER use the make install target in the makefile, you'll ruin and bloat your system installing directly from source, learn how to make proper slackware packages of your applications you compile with checkinstall.

    thing is, you'll be back to packages again which I know you're trying your hardest to avoid to make it at least 30 times more difficult for yourself.

    I can almost see you building KDE 3.5 from source and then making packages from it, when that whole waste of time can be avoided by just downloading _their_ binary packages in the first place.

    do you get the point of learning how to make packages and use them wisely now?

  10. #10
    Linux Enthusiast Weedman's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Tasmania, Australia
    Posts
    640
    yeah i get the point.

    btw, is there anyway of making a slack package from a source tarball?
    "Time has more than one meaning, and is more than one dimension" - /.unknown
    --Registered Linux user #396583--

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •