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I am running the latest slackware but haven't run current for a few months. I was wondering if I am missing something or if I do it will something break? ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Engineer adrenaline's Avatar
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    Slackware current


    I am running the latest slackware but haven't run current for a few months. I was wondering if I am missing something or if I do it will something break? I think the last time I ran current was in November. Anything good since then?

    Do I need to watch out for anything?

    Mike
    Some people have told me they don't think a fat penguin really embodies the grace of Linux, which just tells me they have never seen a angry penguin charging at them in excess of 100mph. They'd be a lot more careful about what they say if they had.
    -- Linus Torvalds

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by adrenaline
    I am running the latest slackware but haven't run current for a few months. I was wondering if I am missing something or if I do it will something break? I think the last time I ran current was in November. Anything good since then?

    Do I need to watch out for anything?

    Mike
    By latest Slackware do you mean 10.2?

    I would recommend always keeping up-to-date with current either by browsing a server with all packages or, more preferrably, using slackpkg. It allows you to check whether or not you have the latest versions of packages.

    e.g. Slackware 10.2 comes with Firefox 1.0 (or something similar I think) and yet current has 1.5 in it. Using slackpkg you would be able to use the command:
    slackpkg upgrade-all (IIRC)

    and it would detect that your firefox is out of date, it would then download and install the new version for it.

    Generally doing this something wouldn't break however IIRC, when upgrading all it tried to replace my 2.6 kernel (which I got from /testing) with the latest 2.4 kernel in current. This was easily solved by using settings slackpkg to ignore: kernel-modules, kernel-driver, kernel-source (and all related kernel packages).

    I definately recommend that you use slackpkg though.

  3. #3
    Linux User St. Joe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by adrenaline
    Do I need to watch out for anything?
    Why not just do this for yourself? Read the Current Changelog.
    It may be that your sole purpose in life is simply to serve as a warning to others.

  4. #4
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    X11R6.9 just got added, and new kernels which I dont use.

    but current is more fun that stable, I use stable on my NAT/Firewall/HTTP box though.

    all you need is an rsync script and you're away

  5. #5
    Linux Engineer adrenaline's Avatar
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    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by TomX
    By latest Slackware do you mean 10.2?

    I would recommend always keeping up-to-date with current either by browsing a server with all packages or, more preferrably, using slackpkg. It allows you to check whether or not you have the latest versions of packages.

    e.g. Slackware 10.2 comes with Firefox 1.0 (or something similar I think) and yet current has 1.5 in it. Using slackpkg you would be able to use the command:
    slackpkg upgrade-all (IIRC)

    and it would detect that your firefox is out of date, it would then download and install the new version for it.

    Generally doing this something wouldn't break however IIRC, when upgrading all it tried to replace my 2.6 kernel (which I got from /testing) with the latest 2.4 kernel in current. This was easily solved by using settings slackpkg to ignore: kernel-modules, kernel-driver, kernel-source (and all related kernel packages).

    I definately recommend that you use slackpkg though.
    Great advice but I usually rsync to the current mirror and then it allows me to upgrade what I want. I then don't need to worry about kernel stuff as I use the 2.6 also.

    I was just wondering because last year I did a kde update and it broke and I remember it wasn't a fun fix.

    Thanks
    Some people have told me they don't think a fat penguin really embodies the grace of Linux, which just tells me they have never seen a angry penguin charging at them in excess of 100mph. They'd be a lot more careful about what they say if they had.
    -- Linus Torvalds

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