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Hey, I'm currently using Arch Linux but although it's a nice distribution, I'm missing Slackware a bit. One thing I do like about Arch with respect to Slackware is that ...
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  1. #1
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    How do you keep track of new packages?


    Hey,

    I'm currently using Arch Linux but although it's a nice distribution, I'm missing Slackware a bit.

    One thing I do like about Arch with respect to Slackware is that if say a new version of MPlayer comes out, it will automatically be downloaded and installed through pacman.

    However on Slackware if a new version of MPlayer was released I wouldn't know about it.

    Basically what I'm asking is how do you keep track of when updates to the programs you use are released?

    I would have thought some good solutions would be somehow synchronizing with SourceForge/Freshmeat which would e-mail (or through RSS) you information about new builds.

    Another solution would be to subscribe to the mailing lists of each of the programs but I doubt all the packages I use have a mailing lists, though I'm not sure?

    So, how do you do it?

    Thanks
    Tom

  2. #2
    oz
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    You could try something like swaret, or slapt-get. They work a bit like Debian's apt-get but aren't nearly as good as apt-get, or Pacman for that matter.

    HTH...

    ozar
    oz

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozar
    You could try something like swaret, or slapt-get. They work a bit like Debian's apt-get but aren't nearly as good as apt-get, or Pacman for that matter.

    HTH...

    ozar
    I guess I should have mentioned, I don't want to use any third-party applications except checkinstall and slackpkg.

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  5. #4
    oz
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    Ah, no 3rd party apps. Well, you could keep an eye on the change logs to see what new packages have been put on the mirrors:

    http://www.slackware.com/changelog/

    ...then use either pkgtool or slackpkg to install them. I think slackpkg offers an "update" option, too.
    oz

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    Quote Originally Posted by ozar
    Ah, no 3rd party apps. Well, you could keep an eye on the change logs to see what new packages have been put on the mirrors:

    http://www.slackware.com/changelog/

    ...then use either pkgtool or slackpkg to install them. I think slackpkg offers an "update" option, too.
    Yeah, I don't mind using slackpkg and every so often I'd run:
    slackpkg upgrade-all

    which would download and install all updated packages in -current from the closest mirror to me, however, as we know, Slackware, as conservative as it is, has few (with respect to other repositories) packages in its repository.

    So whilst getting the latest stable version of packages such as coreutils or firefox is easy since they're in current and slackpkg but when it comes to a package such as Opera, if a new version of it came out I wouldn't know unless I checked out their website, which I wouldn't regularly do.

    Another problem with Opera is that their installation is lame for Slackware. I would like all installed programs to be installed through pkgtool but Opera tries to handle this thereselves... meh.

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    anything which can not be packaged I put in /opt

    then every once in a while I'll go in there, swear at them, change a few to packages because it was something trivial not letting me package it before, or it cant be packaged too well, ie opera etc.

  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by kern
    anything which can not be packaged I put in /opt

    then every once in a while I'll go in there, swear at them, change a few to packages because it was something trivial not letting me package it before, or it cant be packaged too well, ie opera etc.
    o.0, that's a nice solution. If I were to install Slackware I'd do that (also, if I stay with Arch I'll put awkward programs in /opt: OO, Java, ET, Q4).

    But still, how do you keep track of when your packages are out of date?

  9. #8
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    out of date?

    just put new ones on!



    I just go around to a few websites like xchat etc or the openoffice website and take a look.

    I dont really have much in /opt ..

    limewire, devkitARM (gba cross compiler toolchain), acrobat7, openoffice, realplayer10

    thats all, all of them arent packages obviously else they would be installed normally, however if you want to update them so to speak you just delete the dir, and put the new one there, openoffice is a package anyway, but it installs to /opt, cool

    I guess I only have about 20 or 30 apps tops that are not in slackware-current, so I just use firefox from current, etc, when current tree gets updated, so does my firefox, easiest way for applications that come with slackware.. other stuff, package it if possible so it can be upgraded with your future packages, try to find a slackbuild script so you can make a package, or place it in /opt !

  10. #9
    oz
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomX
    But still, how do you keep track of when your packages are out of date?
    Slackware has never been much on automation, so while that may come in the future, I think it's still a manual process for the most part.

    You can see all your installed packages from within pkgtool, so you could compare that list with the listing of new packages listed on the change log. Slow perhaps, but that's the only way I know of to do it without using 3rd party software to track all of it.

    Maybe someone else knows of something else.

    ozar
    oz

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozar
    Slackware has never been much on automation, so while that may come in the future, I think it's still a manual process for the most part.

    You can see all your installed packages from within pkgtool, so you could compare that list with the listing of new packages listed on the change log. Slow perhaps, but that's the only way I know of to do it without using 3rd party software to track all of it.

    Maybe someone else knows of something else.

    ozar
    I still don't think you understand what I mean

    I'd be fine for packages within current since slackpkg manages these.

    However, when it comes to a program not in current it would be more difficult to maintain. Sure, you could download the source from the programs website, configure it, compile it and then checkinstall it.

    My problem is knowing when I need to download new source code. Changelog doesn't say anything about programs that aren't in current/extra/testing.

    The most simple solution is just to check the programs websites daily, but this is tedious.

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