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I just did a fresh install of slack 10.2, and now whenever I pop a blank cd into the drive, and try to copy data to it, I get a ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined!
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    Wrong filesystem for blank cds


    I just did a fresh install of slack 10.2, and now whenever I pop a blank cd into the drive, and try to copy data to it, I get a 'Error: You must specify the correct filesystem'. I was under the impression that blank cds and dvds didn't have a filesystem, but I'm not too sure how I would go about telling slack this.
    I also tried mounting it(of course), but it didn't do anything except give me that error. Any ideas?

  2. #2
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    Yes, CDs do use filesystems. They use the iso9660 format.

    Try this code in a shell as the root user:

    # mount -t iso9660 -r /dev/*cd/dvd drive name here* /mnt/*cd/dvd drive name here*

    Just a suggestion. Let me know if it doesn't work.

  3. #3
    Linux Enthusiast
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    Wait, wait, wait!!! Let me get this straight, you're trying to copy files to a blank CD by manually dragging the files to the CD? That's never going to work! That's not even how you make CDs in Windows, so there should be no reason why you're trying that in Linux.

    I would suggest getting K3B, which can be found at www.linuxpackages.net . I've never actually used K3B, but it's a front end to cdrecord (which is what I use).

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  5. #4
    Linux Guru Cabhan's Avatar
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    You do not write to a CD in a normal manner, rather by burning to the CD. In Windows, some programs make it look like you just copy-paste, but this is in reality a frontend for the burn process.

    k3b is pretty much the program to go for. I use it myself, and it's very easy to use, and very good at what it does. It also burns very quickly (for me, at least).

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