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Hello all, I've been digging around the doc's, manpages, etc..etc.., but I can't seem to find what I'm looking for. In Slackware-11, by default, there is no /etc/bashrc , /etc/bash_profile ...
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  1. #1
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    A few questions about "bashrc"????


    Hello all,

    I've been digging around the doc's, manpages, etc..etc.., but I can't seem to find what I'm looking for. In Slackware-11, by default, there is no /etc/bashrc, /etc/bash_profile, and no ~/.bashrc. The only file like these available in Slack is "/etc/profile". Now in every tutorial I've read so far it says to put this in ~/.bashrc...
    Code:
      if [ -f /etc/bashrc ]; then
            . /etc/bashrc   
    fi
    Does this mean that I need to create an /etc/bashrc file, or can I just ommit that line in my newly created ~/.bashrc ???

    Another question, what does this mean???
    Code:
    export MINICOM="-c on"
    Also, if I wanted to change my CFLAGS or CXXFLAGS, would I put that in "/etc/bashrc" or in "/etc/profile" ???

  2. #2
    Blackfooted Penguin daark.child's Avatar
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    You don't have to create an /etc/bashrc. The file is read if it exists and if its not there, there is no problem.

    Is the minicom command not supposed to be
    Code:
    export MINICOM="minicom -c on"
    According to the manual, using the -c flag enables colouring in the minicom program.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by southpaw
    Also, if I wanted to change my CFLAGS or CXXFLAGS, would I put that in "/etc/bashrc" or in "/etc/profile" ???

    You'd put an executable script with the required commands in, in /etc/profile.d/ and it would be sourced with every user login automatically.

    better than editing /etc/profile directly as this might get overwritten with new packages during upgrades etc.

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