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Hello everyone. I'm brand new to Linux (Had Alinux 12.8 up and running for 2 days now) as I am sick to frigging death of Windows, ad-nauseum, and I was ...
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  1. #1
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    Tutorials and info


    Hello everyone.

    I'm brand new to Linux (Had Alinux 12.8 up and running for 2 days now) as I am sick to frigging death of Windows, ad-nauseum, and I was wondering if there is a basic tutorial or something that can give me a clearer picture of how things work, and how I can accomplish something as basic as installing some drivers for my video, motherboard and sound. I'm Ok with anything that's complicated, and will always be more comfortable at a DOS prompt (or an assembler prompt) than a mouse cursor. I just need info. I'm getting old and don't have the time to learn it all the hard way again. Any help appreciated. And no, I didn't manage to Google up anything useful, other than extremely basic stuff (how to logon, duh, how to logoff, duh).

    THanks in advance.

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    Yes, I just found the "Tutorials and Info" section on this forum. Yes, sometimess I overlook the simple things. Yes, sometimes I'm a farking idiot. Yes, I know.

  3. #3
    Linux Newbie rudie_rage's Avatar
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    Welcome to linux, and the forums

    Hrm, prompting yourself to RTFM without being told, I think you have potential to learn pretty quickly
    Living the digital dream....
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    Linux Guru bigtomrodney's Avatar
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    A great resource - The Linux Documentation Project

    If you get to the scripting stage check out The Advanced Bash Scripting Guide.

    Linux is basically a Unix variant so between the mountains of pages that have turned up on the net in recent years on Linux you can also check out a lot of history on Unix to get a good idea of the bigger picture.

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    Thanks for the welcome, Rudie, and thanks for the link, BigTom.

    I would like to ask a question here, rather than have to search for it. My question concerns the Linux distribution I chose. I've searched for information on this, but it's pretty murky.

    I originally picked it because it was supposed to have the best GUI for previous Windows users (I'm planning on eventually switching my entire household of 5 PC's over), but I've begun to reconsider my decision. What I've found, as far as drivers, etc. are concerned, is that Alinux just isn't mentioned, but Debian, Red Hat, and others are. Now, not being a Linux guru (yet), I don't know whether these other drivers (specifically, for right now, those for audio and video) will work in other distributions. I suppose I should also voice a concern over available applications, but after seeing what's out there, and what comes with most distros, that doesn't seem anything to worry over right now.

  6. #6
    Linux Engineer Freston's Avatar
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    Ehm. You're asking these questions on a Slackware forum. You have a better chance of getting a good answer on the 'other distro's' forum, or on the aLinux forum itself.

    But as far as I understand it, aLinux is a distro with a small user base. Often a small distro is geared towards a specific goal. So there is no harm in having a small distro as OS. It may very well be what you need. The downside is that for extra's like drivers or applications outside the scope of the distro, you need to shop around.

    Most big applications have several ways of installing. .rpm, .deb, .tar.gz and such. But then, some don't. If no .rpm is available, you may need to compile from source. So, yes you will be able to get most things running under aLinux. But you may need to shop around, and perhaps compile from source, Slack-style

    About the GUI. I wouldn't concern myself trying to get a GUI just like 'the Big Brands'. All distro's come with a GUI, most have either or both KDE and Gnome, plus some lighter ones like Xfce, fluxbox and the like. And they are all pretty straightforward once you get used to them.

    If you want to switch your entire household over, I feel comfortable recommending *buntu (depending on your choice of GUI). They have a large user base, lots of support and documentation, and as long as you don't do any really weird stuff (K)Ubuntu is very easy to set up and maintain.

    But, as you say you're more comfortable with a prompt than with a cursor, you may be willing to invest some of your efforts into Slackware or Debian. But perhaps Fedora, openSuSE or the likes suit you better. It's always best to try several distro's before you settle on one.

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    Linux Newbie rudie_rage's Avatar
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    I have to agree with Freston on this one. Installing and testing out multiple distros is definitely good for learning lots for many reasons.

    First of all, different distros come with different GUI's, so not only will you begin to learn what GUI you like best you start to understand how things work behind the GUI. A gnome/KDE based distro will tend to automount drives for you, but if you try a xfce or fluxbox based distro you'll begin to learn how to do it yourself, and similarly how gnome/kde does it behind the scenes. In a nutshell, in switching GUI's you become less dependent on it.

    Secondly, Installing multiple versions of linux will make you a little more intimate with your hardware. You're bound to run into trouble somewhere installing some distro or another, and then you get to learn about choosing and/or compiling kernels to support your hardware.

    I'm sure there are a dozen or more other benefits but thats what comes to my mind.
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    Thanks, guys. I'm downloading a couple others now (PCLinuxOS, and Debian...Debian is HUGE) and will probably download several others, including Ubuntu and anything else I can get my hands on. I sort of feel like a kid in a candy store where everything is free, if you'll carry it yourself. I wish my DSL were better than it is....takes me about 6 hours to download 800 megabytes, and most places where you can download, either deliberately disconnect you after awhile, or throttle your speed down to nearly nothing...apparently, they're wanting you to buy the disks. I did find a place where single CD's are like $3 or so, most of the time...probably going to order a bunch soon.

    Anyway, that's irrevelant. I was going to mention something about downloads...oh, yes. i found a program aclled DAP, or Download Accelerator Plus. I don't think there's a Linux version, but this one will automatically resume, and it will also search for other sites matching the one your downloading, and it will pull from several sources at once, so even if they use throttling, you can download at nearly your full bandwidth anyway. It's $35, but there's a free version that does everything you'll need it to, no time limit (as far as I can tell). Don't think there's a Linux version, but if anyone knows if something that's equivilent, I'd sure like to know about it. I had to go back to an XP machine for a few days, until I could get some things downloaded.

    Oh, and regarding using this forum...I thought ALinux was based on Slackware, or I'd have tried to find another place to ask my questions. I couldn't find a forum at Alinux.org....most of the links are broken, even the download link is incorrect (I found the correct one....this is it: ftp://linux-ds.unidu.hr/alinux/alinux-12.8.iso and it actually works, though I doubt anyone here will want it.) and the only other forum I found that mentioned Alinux with any frequency hadn't been posted to for over 6 months. I can, though, refrain from asking Alinux-specific questions here, and put them on the "Other Distros" forum, no problem.

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    Welcome to Linux, Stickman. It's an adventure! I think we've all been through what you're going through. Don't worry, you'll eventually find a distro you're comfortable with. I eventually settled on Slackware for it's simplicity and stability. One of the main things I like about Slackware is, it doesn't do anything unless I tell it to. None of this auto-anything crap. I despise computers, and/or, software that does things without my knowledge.

    Oh, by the way, my favorite CD shop:

    www.edmunds-enterprises.com


    Happy Linuxing,
    Pilgrim

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    I know what you mean about the unformed actions on the part of an operating system. That's one of the reasons MS crap makes me so angry. Half the time, I could look at my internet connection while I'm typing up a document, or working on a spreadshee, etc., not using my internet connection at all, and it's pouring crap out onto the internet at my full bandwidth, straight to Microsoft.com, I'm sure. And then there's the inability to remove certain services in Windows without screwing up nearly everything else. And of course you have the susceptibility to invasion from nearly every other PC on the planet unless you've spent hundreds of dollars on firewalls, Anti-Viral, anti-trojan, and anti-hacker software, only to find that even though you've spent 20 hours trying to configure it so that you can still access the internet (after spending 40 hours re-configuring it so you can again, access the internet), it slows your PC and connection speed down to a slow crawl. Yep, simple is better, in most cases. I liked Windows better before it was the actual operating system, but rather an application you simply installed after you bought a machine with DOS on it.

    But anyway, the reason I'm using the more GUI-inclined Linux releases is because I plan on switching my entire household over to Linux, and I don't want to have to spend 6 months teaching everyone in my family extensive Linux courses to allow them to do the stuff they need to get done.

    I'm going to have a look at your CD shop now (is that yours, or just one you found?).

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