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No such luck... I tried to do the 10.3 install, and I get the same black screen I've run the memory tests, swapped proccessors, it'll start on either one, but ...
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  1. #11
    Just Joined! Skorpio's Avatar
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    No such luck... I tried to do the 10.3 install, and I get the same black screen I've run the memory tests, swapped proccessors, it'll start on either one, but not both...

  2. #12
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    SMP Kernel

    I remember installing SLED once and had to get a version of the kernel called SMP and install it before it saw and used both processors I believe it's called kernel-bigsmp you can get it by doing an online update during the install and then add the second processor and see how that works just make sure it's the SMP kernel. Doing a little more research on this with Google might be a good idea as well. I wish you the best of luck and hope this helps.

  3. #13
    Linux Engineer aliov's Avatar
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    what about if you pass nosmp to the kernel !
    Linux is not only an operating system, it's a philosophy.
    Archost.

  4. #14
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    I think I may have found some of the problem. The processors that I bought were supposed to be a matched set, but in analyzing them through KNOPPIX, I found that the stepping is different. I know that sometimes it doesn't make a difference (such as in KNOPPIX), but that it might in other situations. Do you think that this might be it??

  5. #15
    Linux Engineer aliov's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skorpio View Post
    I think I may have found some of the problem. The processors that I bought were supposed to be a matched set, but in analyzing them through KNOPPIX, I found that the stepping is different. I know that sometimes it doesn't make a difference (such as in KNOPPIX), but that it might in other situations. Do you think that this might be it??
    I think yes, since one processor alone is working but not both ! probably a modules loaded by suse is giving this problem.
    Linux is not only an operating system, it's a philosophy.
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  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skorpio View Post
    Hello all. Nube here, as this is my first post... be gentle.
    I've taken the step to Linux, in the form of an HP Kayak XM600. It came with only the single processor and 1 gig of Rambus, and I successfully installed OpenSuse 10.2, and configured. I have since upgraded to dual 933's. Everything runs perfectly with a single 933, but as soon as I add the second processor, I get a black screen. Even when I try a new install off the CD, as soon as I select the option to boot off the CD, it tries to load the kernel and then Black screens again. The Bios sees both processors, so I know that's not the problem. Any suggestions?
    Hello.
    you have a interesting problem.
    1.) You have bought a HP computer. Especially to install a Linux operation system (OS) on it.
    2.) You did install "OpenSuse" on your new computer. You also configured it.
    3.) Up and till that moment, your specs on that new computer where a CPU and 1GB RAM.

    4.) You have bought a second CPU (processor). This CPU is the same kind as your other one that you are already using for a little while.

    5.) So you have two processors (CPU's) that are "dual cores" (they have two cores).

    6.) Your system does not have any problems, while using only one CPU.

    ----------------------

    From here on, we have to be alert:

    7.) When you add the second processor to your system, you get errors.

    8.) You conclude that because your BIOS reports seeing two CPU's, that you BIOS is correctly set. You are possibly wrong.

    --------------------

    Final thoughts

    9.) The settings/configurations you have, work fine with one CPU.

    10.) If it does not work fine anymore, by adding a second one to your system, than you simply will have to adjust your settings to the new situation, respectively to the new system. As a system with two processors, is a other system than one with only one processor.

    If your BIOS sees and reports the fact that there are two processors in the system, that does not disburden you from doing a little work and a few adjustments. Not everything that sounds logic, is in fact logic.

    Each time, you change from one to two CPU's, or from two CPU's back to only one CPU, you will have to adjust your settings. Or else yours system won't work properly, and show those black screens.

    If you stay with only one CPU, it is clear, that your system works ok, because your settings are set according to the layout of components that your system is made of.

    Probably also better, if you decide, if you want to stay with only one CPU, or if you want to stay with two CPU's, so you would not have to change the settings so often, because of adding or removing a CPU.

    Further, if you have two dual core processors, you actually have the same as if you had one quad core processor.

    A quad core processor, respectively two dual core processors, deliver(s) a very high performance. According to this, you will have to adapt/match all your other components of your system, and finally achieve a system that can cope with four cores. And that all components work well together.

    The most important "team-work", is that your mainboard/motherboard works well together with your CPU('s).

    And here again, we are with the issue of the BIOS: Because to get that good team-work, you might have to change/adjust your settings in your BIOS, and possible also do some manual adjustments to your hardware.

    You see: It is not all that easy, with just adding or taking away a CPU, and expecting that your system will automatically adapt to the different situation, and to speak it correctly: To the different system.

    Thank you, for your attention.

    Have fun and enjoy.

    Kind regards,
    Alexander

  7. #17
    Just Joined! Skorpio's Avatar
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    Not quite. This system is not a dual core system. It's a Pentium III, slot 1, dual Processor system. Today, I successfully installed XP Pro with both processors. I bought this HP brand new several years ago (I believe it was in 98/99) with only a single CPU, and it's been in the closet for several years. I dug it out with the express purpose of putting a second processor and Linux on it. I think that I may have discovered the problem, and that has been possibly verified by Ailov, in that the stepping of the processors is slightly different. This computer came with the exact options that are currently on/in it as with the dual 933 processors, but I opted for the single at the time due to money/need restraints.

    Thanks for the input, and I'll be sure to keep all of that in mind as I move foward...

  8. #18
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    Hello skorpio,
    thanks for your clarification and kind words.

    You might still have to consider a upgrading, because a lot of todays software/programs use a lot of resources.

    But the issue about the two different steppings, is sure important, and should be taken under closer ... whatever...

    Errr....: Whait a minute: Even if the specs where designed for those two processors, you might still have to adjust to your settings, so that it will work with the two.

    Trying it out, won't cost you anything, or do any harm: It will either do the trick, or not. Or it might be necessary, togheter with the adjustment for the steppings.

    Anyway: Some work to do with the settings. You won't be able to avoid doing that.
    Some manual work. Not all automatic... Not all doing by itself. Have to do some touches, some tweeking.

    Cheers,
    Alexander

  9. #19
    Just Joined! Skorpio's Avatar
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    Not a problem... I decided to do this as simply a learning experience. I'm a complete noob with Unix/Linux, but I've started working (very minor) with Oracle Databases at work, and thought what a better time to learn. I'm going to use this box as a toy/learning tool, with the possibility of some other things. I'm a Systems/Applications Admin by trade, so it can only help me in the long run...

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