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I am relatively new to linux so any advice that could help would be much appreciated . I have installed openSUSE 10.3 on to my PC and it will not ...
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  1. #1
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    MBR Errors with OpenSUSE 10.3


    I am relatively new to linux so any advice that could help would be much appreciated .

    I have installed openSUSE 10.3 on to my PC and it will not boot. I carried out the installation by setting up my USB pendrive with SYSLINUX bootloader, which I then boot from and pointed at the hard drive partition with the openSUSE ISO file on installed fine. My setup is that I have three hard drives:

    180GB primary master.
    60GB primary slave.
    40GB secondary master.

    Note: order shown is BIOS boot order.

    During the installation I partitioned the hard drives in the following way:

    180GB not partitioned as will be used for backup at a later point.
    60GB Partitions:
    -- 30GB /opt.
    -- 20GB /home.
    -- 10GB NTFS for openSUSE ISO, partition will be removed of shrunken after successful installation.

    40GB Partitions:
    -- 1GB /boot.
    -- 2GB swap.
    -- 37GB /.

    Note: order of partitions shown is order they exist on the hard drives.

    After installation I remove the USB pendrive and when rebooting PC I am faced with following message:

    Verifying DMI Pool Data....
    MBR Error 3

    MBR Error 1
    Press any key to boot from floppy

    Have I partitioned correctly? With the boot order shown earlier does this need to be changed so the drive with the /boot partition is loaded first from BIOS?

    If so would the following BIOS boot order be fine?
    -- Boot 1st 40GB (with /boot on).
    -- Boot 2nd 60GB.
    -- Boot 3rd 180GB.

    If this is so, how does this effect Linux labelling the drives e.g. hda, hdb, hdc?

    For example will the drives be labelled according to which is booted first from the BIOS?
    Example:

    Boot 1st
    40GB = hda:
    -- 1GB /boot = hda1.
    -- 2GB swap = hda2.
    -- 37GB / =hda3.

    Boot 2nd
    60GB = hdb:
    -- 30GB /opt = hdb1.
    -- 20GB swap = hdb2.
    -- 10GB NTFS = hdb3.

    Boot 3rd
    180GB = hdc.

    Or will Linux ignore the BIOS boot order and label the drives according to how their jumpers are set (e.g. Master, Slave) ?
    Example:

    Boot 1st
    40GB = hdc:
    -- 1GB /boot = hdc1.
    -- 2GB swap = hdc2.
    -- 37GB / =hdc3.

    Boot 2nd
    60GB = hdb:
    -- 30GB /opt = hdb1.
    -- 20GB swap = hdb2.
    -- 10GB NTFS = hdb3.

    Boot 3rd
    180GB = hda.

    Does the boot order matter or will BIOS look for the GRUB Boot loader automatically? Do I need to edit the GRUB menu.lst and how would this look when configured correctly to my setup?

    Also the other problem is when I now plugin the USB pendrive it does not load SYSLINUX bootloader any more even when boot order has been set to boot USB first, I receive the following message:

    GRUB loading, stage 1.5.

    GRUB loading, please wait...
    Error 15

    Thanks in advance for any help you guys can provide .

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by birdeboy View Post
    With the boot order shown earlier does this need to be changed so the drive with the /boot partition is loaded first from BIOS?
    Yes, I think that would work if your BIOS will let you do it. The problem is that the BIOS is trying to boot by default from the primary master, which does not have a bootloader on it.
    If this is so, how does this effect Linux labelling the drives e.g. hda, hdb, hdc?
    Itdoesn't affect the Linux disk designations at all. In Linux, the primary master is always hda, the primary slave hdb, and the secondary hard drives hdc and hdd. The boot order is immaterial, that's the business of the BIOS, not the OS.
    Do I need to edit the GRUB menu.lst and how would this look when configured correctly to my setup?
    Probably not if you can get the BIOS to boot from the right disk.
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"
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  3. #3
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    Chandigarh, India
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    Is there any reason for installing SuSe using USB Boot Loader? Why dont you install it directly from Installation CD/DVD? BIOS looks for Boot Loader in MBR of First Boot Device only. I would suggest you to Plug-in 80GB disk as Primary and create only 3 partitions. /, /home and SWAP. There is no need to create separate /boot partition. 10-12 GB is enough for whole Desktop installation.
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
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