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Hi Im quite new to linux and i just mounted my first secondary hd. My problem is that i mounted the hd to a folder, but now i have no ...
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  1. #1
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    hardrive permissions


    Hi

    Im quite new to linux and i just mounted my first secondary hd. My problem is that i mounted the hd to a folder, but now i have no permission to copy, delete or paste in that folder. Even when i am logged in as "root" and i try and change the permissions of the folder, it says i cant change it.
    Anyone have any advise please?

    Thx

  2. #2
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    if that hdd is ntfs, linux can't write to it.... it's "only read".

  3. #3
    Linux Guru sdousley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mantasman
    if that hdd is ntfs, linux can't write to it.... it's "only read".
    depending on the kernel you have, you can update files on ntfs partitions, but not create new ones.

    How have you mounted it? just from the command line? I have a windows drive mounting from my fstab, and i had to set certain permissions in the fstab to allow me to write to it. Below is a line to mount my windows' C Drive

    Code:
    /dev/hda1	/media/win/c vfat users,umask=0002,gid=users 0 0
    Hope this helps you.
    "I am not an alcoholic, alcoholics go to meetings"
    Registered Linux user = #372327

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    Quote Originally Posted by mantasman
    if that hdd is ntfs, linux can't write to it.... it's "only read".
    with the tool http://www.jankratochvil.net/project/captive/ you can write to NTFS from Linux!

  5. #5
    Linux Guru kkubasik's Avatar
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    as a general rule, thats not the best of ideas..... write support to NTFS is iffy, and you tend to overwrite parts of other files. Read is fine, but i would recommend only writing if you absolutly have to.
    Avoid the Gates of Hell. Use Linux
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  6. #6
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    @Frikkie
    if the HD is in NTFS, the Question is... do you really need it to stay NTFS or why not reformat it to Linux native?

  7. #7
    Linux Guru sdousley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DgWsd
    @Frikkie
    if the HD is in NTFS, the Question is... do you really need it to stay NTFS or why not reformat it to Linux native?
    Maybe if it's got windows on it it wouldn't b possible to change to linux native, in which case it you are happy reformnatting, format it to Fat32, that's what i have all my win drives on. I know it's not a brilliant idea as it's not as secure as NTFS, but it does allow me to transfer files to/from linux and windows!
    "I am not an alcoholic, alcoholics go to meetings"
    Registered Linux user = #372327

  8. #8
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    Thx so much for the help guys. The problem was that the hd was ntfs. I reformatted it to fat32, because i want to use it on my windows system as well. Thx.

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