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I need my /home & subdirectories to be open to everyone.. I have the permissions set & its working except that I have to do it for every folder from ...
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  1. #1
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    how to unsecure /home


    I need my /home & subdirectories to be open to everyone.. I have the permissions set & its working except that I have to do it for every folder from wherever it was created.. & hitting the "include permission to enclosed files" button isn't helping.

    I am on a private home network & security here is absolutely not an issue.

    & /me is a linux newb so be kind

  2. #2
    Linux Guru gogalthorp's Avatar
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    Which desktop?

    The Apply changes to subdirectories should work. But it really is easier from teh command line (CL)

    To give full read/write/execute

    chmod -R 7777 ~/*.*

    will change all recursively to wide open.

    Note this is really not the greatest idea it would be better to create a directory for all to share and restrict sharing to that. Even though you have no problems with the local network users, in theory you might allow some one in that may have bad intentions by the Internet. Admittedly the chance is small but if every user has full permissions then you are

    Note that the above only changes existing files new files will be created with the default mask. If you want to change the mask for new users go to Yast-Security Users-Users and Group Management Select defaults for new users tab and make umask 000

    Also if you must do it please only change permissions in the /home directories.

    So even though I told you how to do it I highly recommend you don't.

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    there are constantly new folders being made & I Tried a 2nd folder inside of it & it had the same thing.. I am pretty newb on the user permissions, ideally that would be the right move, but I havent been able to get it to work.

    Edit: after playing with the permissions I can now modify everything from my windows machine that I create or modify locally, But not the other way around..

    Edit 2: Nevermind I figured it out. I jsut had to add my local user to group nobody

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  5. #4
    Linux Guru gogalthorp's Avatar
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    Windows has no real ownership/permissions and can not set them or remember them. If you copy a file to Windows and then back it will no longer have the permissions. As you found out Samba uses the nobody group to get around that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gogalthorp View Post
    Windows has no real ownership/permissions and can not set them or remember them. If you copy a file to Windows and then back it will no longer have the permissions. As you found out Samba uses the nobody group to get around that.
    yea nothing is going to the windows box, but occasionally some will originate there.. For as common sense as most of linux is though I don't get why it was so difficult. I Was expecting there to be a unsecured command somewhere to run once & be done..

  7. #6
    Linux Guru gogalthorp's Avatar
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    It is hard to side step Unix permissions. If it was easy then you machine would not be secure. Unlike Windows security is built into Linux/Unix systems. In Windows it was added on as a third thought. If you do not want security run Windows.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gogalthorp View Post
    It is hard to side step Unix permissions. If it was easy then you machine would not be secure. Unlike Windows security is built into Linux/Unix systems. In Windows it was added on as a third thought. If you do not want security run Windows.
    I Dont want the security but I was running windows up until it amazingly courrupted over a TB of data..

    My point is that with as versatile as linux that its difficult at times to just make it simple..

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