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I wonder if that works. Because normally you have to compile, configure and install a kernel, and not via a rpm. The kernel sources have to be in /usr/src/linux. And ...
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  1. #21
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    142

    I wonder if that works.
    Because normally you have to compile, configure and install a kernel, and not via a rpm.
    The kernel sources have to be in /usr/src/linux.
    And all kernels are available in this way.

    Compiling can be done with either make xconfig, make config or make menuconfig.
    This on the command-line from /usr/src/linux.
    Xconfig is a graphical tool where you can select everything you want in the kernel.
    But several tools have to be installed, gcc, binutils, modules, qt, etc.
    However it is no joke to compile and install a new kernel.
    Remember it is the heart of your OS.

    Anyway here are some examples:

    How To Compile A Kernel - The SuSE Way | HowtoForge - Linux Howtos and Tutorials

    Configure, Build and Install a Custom Linux Kernel - openSUSE

  2. #22
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,746
    Quote Originally Posted by linuxforever View Post
    I wonder if that works.
    Because normally you have to compile, configure and install a kernel, and not via a rpm.
    The kernel sources have to be in /usr/src/linux.
    And all kernels are available in this way.

    Compiling can be done with either make xconfig, make config or make menuconfig.
    This on the command-line from /usr/src/linux.
    Xconfig is a graphical tool where you can select everything you want in the kernel.
    But several tools have to be installed, gcc, binutils, modules, qt, etc.
    However it is no joke to compile and install a new kernel.
    Remember it is the heart of your OS.

    Anyway here are some examples:

    How To Compile A Kernel - The SuSE Way | HowtoForge - Linux Howtos and Tutorials

    Configure, Build and Install a Custom Linux Kernel - openSUSE
    Kernels are distributed pre-compiled for update purposes all the time. You didn't compile a kernel when you installed openSuSE or Debian or Ubuntu. And you don't compile a kernel when you get a new version via an update (apt-get upgrade, yum, etc.)

  3. #23
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    142
    Well, I did once a kernel update, and after that he didn't reboot anymore.
    So I left kernel updates for what they were.

    But you can always compile your kernel for your needs.
    Use only things you actually need which makes him smaller and faster.
    For this reason the kernel sources are always included in every distro.
    Also you can use the kernels (sources) from the official kernel.org site.
    Unpack the tarball in a folder in /usr/src/linux, and compile from there.

    Of course for the less experienced user it is not recommended to do something with the kernel.
    But once looking in the kernel to see what is in it and not cannot do harm.

  4. #24
    Linux Guru gogalthorp's Avatar
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    Oct 2006
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    West (by God) Virginia
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    3,104
    If you manually installed your video drivers you need to recompile them to attach to the new kernel. This can cause you problems on the first boot after an upgrade. Just reinstall the driver and all is good. This could also apply to other modules that you install by hand (outside of the rpm system) like VM's and possible specialized drivers.

    If you are running a server you should only change any software when there is a security update unless you are having problems that the update may address. And even then it should be checked on a test machine before putting it into production.

  5. #25
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    36

    solved

    These are my steps

    a) Insert cd SLES9 SP3 disk 1 in cd drive
    b) YAST2 - install software choose kernel - select bigsmp kernel and accept
    c) YAST2 handles all the work required and requests for reboot
    d) Reboot confirms that memory is now reported correctly at approx 6 GB


    cat /proc/meminfo|grep Mem
    MemTotal: 6163452 kB
    MemFree: 4925760 kB

    checked /boot
    and found

    initrd -> initrd-2.6.5-7.244-bigsmp



    Thanks a lot to all users who contributed

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