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Originally Posted by linuxforever As I already said is your root-folder / on sda1. And is mounted as / meaning you can see it as / and the device is ...
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by linuxforever View Post
    As I already said is your root-folder / on sda1.
    And is mounted as / meaning you can see it as / and the device is /dev/sda1.
    All other devices you can see in their mountfolders say /home or /local/hda1.
    This means the files that you see on /local/hda1 are actually on the device hda1.

    To move your desktop files to another location just right mouseclick on them.
    Select "move to" and select via rootfolder to the correct location (or select browse).
    You can also move or copy files with the file manager (superuser mode).
    And move/copy files to the locations, folders or devices you want.
    Remember you will find the devices in their mountfolders.

    To download to another location you have to select it in the respective browser you use.
    If you use firefox, select "edit" on top, and "preferences".
    In the main-tab in "downloads" browse to the correct location, and save it.
    In other browsers it should go in a simular way.
    I'm getting "access denied" at both the new drive (when trying to create a new folder) and at the files I want to move. I guess I need to change permissions somehow? I'm stillstruggling with the non-graphical interface commands and procedures.

  2. #22
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    I was assuming that you were using KDE with terminal and file manager?
    In that way you have root rights and can proceed accordingly.

    But when you want to start not in a graphical KDE you can start in the console.
    If you start with root as user with password, you have all rights.
    And you can change rights as you want.
    Anyway the command for changing rights is chmod.
    Most used is chmod 755 and 777, but 777 means everyone has all rights.
    So be carefull!

    So in the end we don't know what you are doing in what terminal/console or GUI?

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by linuxforever View Post
    I was assuming that you were using KDE with terminal and file manager?
    In that way you have root rights and can proceed accordingly.

    But when you want to start not in a graphical KDE you can start in the console.
    If you start with root as user with password, you have all rights.
    And you can change rights as you want.
    Anyway the command for changing rights is chmod.
    Most used is chmod 755 and 777, but 777 means everyone has all rights.
    So be carefull!

    So in the end we don't know what you are doing in what terminal/console or GUI?
    I'm normally using the default KDE GUI. I use X-terminal when necessary for some things I've understood.

  4. #24
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    So what's the problem?
    Just log-in as root on KDE, and you have all rights.
    And all rights to change rights.

  5. #25
    Linux Guru gogalthorp's Avatar
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    A warning note you should avoid running a GUI as root. If you must log in do what need to be done and logout. You can seriously screw things up in the GUI it is much better to become root via su - then log into the GUI as root. Or select File Manger Super user mode.

    How are you mounting those additional partitions? Is this being done automatically at boot? I suspect you are mounting with incorrect parameters

    Lets see

    cat /etc/fstab

    This file controls where and how the default partitions get mounted.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by gogalthorp View Post
    A warning note you should avoid running a GUI as root. If you must log in do what need to be done and logout. You can seriously

    screw things up in the GUI it is much better to become root via su - then log into the GUI as root. Or select File Manger Super user mode.

    How are you mounting those additional partitions? Is this being done automatically at boot? I suspect you are mounting with incorrect parameters

    Lets see

    cat /etc/fstab

    This file controls where and how the default partitions get mounted.
    Thanks for the warnings - duly noted!

    The mounting is automatic at boot.

    /etc/fstab shows:-


    /dev/sda1 / ext3 acl,user_xattr 1 1
    /dev/sda2 /home ext3 acl,user_xattr 1 2
    /dev/hdc1 swap swap defaults 0 0
    proc /proc proc defaults 0 0
    sysfs /sys sysfs noauto 0 0
    debugfs /sys/kernel/debug debugfs noauto 0 0
    usbfs /proc/bus/usb usbfs noauto 0 0
    devpts /dev/pts devpts mode=0620,gid=5 0 0
    /dev/fd0 /media/floppy auto noauto,user,sync 0 0
    /dev/fd1 /media/floppy1 auto noauto,user,sync 0 0
    /dev/hdc2 /storagehdc2 ext3 defaults 1 2
    /dev/hdc3 /local/hdc3 ext3 defaults 1 2
    /dev/hda1 /local/hda1 ext3 acl,user_xattr 1 2

    I have not yet got to trying to change any permissions, not had opportunity.

  7. #27
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    Sure gogalthorp, that's true!
    But you can re-log-in as root for a short time.
    You don't need to restart suse.
    And the things you are doing are the same as with su.
    And the firewall is still active.

    By the way, you can see what is being loaded at booting (after the kernel and initrd has been loaded.
    Just hit the Esc key while you are booting.
    And you get a text screen with everything what is being loaded and its status.
    You can see all failures.

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