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I'm still running OpenSuse 10.2. The PC has three HDD's, all mounted, but at differing positions, and all formatted Ext3. I can see and examine all 3 discs OK. Some ...
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    Additiona; Hard Discs for more memory


    I'm still running OpenSuse 10.2. The PC has three HDD's, all mounted, but at differing positions, and all formatted Ext3.
    I can see and examine all 3 discs OK. Some partitions seem to contain common folders.

    I have run into problems of "insufficient memory" reported, but the second and third discs are very little used, having very many GB free. The memory limit seems to be on the main Desktop, which is where various downloads end up.

    My questions are:-

    1. How/where should I mount the additional HDDs so that the PC can seamlessly use this spare disc space as memory?

    2. What should I do to tidy up the apparent duplicate folders presently seen on the additional HDDs ?

    3. How can I confidently identify which HDD is in fact the main OS disk ?

    I am sufficiently PC-literate to understand partitioning, but a bit unskilled still at finding my way through Suse Linux.

    Apologies for three questions at once, but it seems to be all bound up together.

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    oz
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    Quote Originally Posted by toastrack View Post
    I have run into problems of "insufficient memory" reported
    Is that the exact message that you are seeing?

    If so, perhaps the message is in relation to insufficient system memory (RAM) rather than insufficient hard disk space. Just guessing, though.
    oz

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    Quote Originally Posted by ozar View Post
    Is that the exact message that you are seeing?

    If so, perhaps the message is in relation to insufficient system memory (RAM) rather than insufficient hard disk space. Just guessing, though.
    Thanks for that. I'm not certain of the exact wording now of the messages, but I do know that the real stoppage occurred when trying to download over 4GB to the Desktop without realising that there was not that much available memory. Getting rid of that download plus some other stuff cleared the problem, so it looks like it was HDD space that was the problem.

    I recall the error massage inviting me to open Konqueror and delet some items to free up space.

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    oz
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    Quote Originally Posted by toastrack View Post
    I do know that the real stoppage occurred when trying to download over 4GB to the Desktop without realising that there was not that much available memory.
    Not sure what might have been going on, but the failure of a larger than 4GB file to download reminds me of the 4GB file size limit for downloading to partitions that use the FAT filesystem. Of course if you were in Linux and downloading to the "desktop" itself as you indicate above, that was probably on some ext2/3/4 filesystem, which isn't restricted by the 4GB file size limit.

    Either way, glad it's all working for you now.
    oz

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    Quote Originally Posted by ozar View Post
    Not sure what might have been going on, but the failure of a larger than 4GB file to download reminds me of the 4GB file size limit for downloading to partitions that use the FAT filesystem. Of course if you were in Linux and downloading to the "desktop" itself as you indicate above, that was probably on some ext2/3/4 filesystem, which isn't restricted by the 4GB file size limit.

    Either way, glad it's all working for you now.
    Yes, but my basic query re making use of the additional HDDs still remains. BTW, all the disks are formatted ext3. Please, how / where should they be mounted to relieve the Desktop congestion, and how can I be certain which of the discs actually has my OS and important stuff on at present?

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    Please look in Yast in partitioner.
    Here you can see all HDDs, partitions and their mount points.
    The HDDs are usually called /dev/hda or /dev/sda and after a comes b, c, d, etc.
    You can only look and don't do anything to the HDDs.

    Another tool is parted and the graphical gparted.
    But these have to be installed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by linuxforever View Post
    Please look in Yast in partitioner.
    Here you can see all HDDs, partitions and their mount points.
    The HDDs are usually called /dev/hda or /dev/sda and after a comes b, c, d, etc.
    You can only look and don't do anything to the HDDs.

    Another tool is parted and the graphical gparted.
    But these have to be installed.
    Thank you. I've been looking in Partioner OK and understand what it does etc. One big query I have though is what I should put under "Mount" to be able to use all this extra disc space effectively in normal use. i.e., should it be / or /local or what ?? Yhis is really the nub of what I haven't yet understood.

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    A mountpoint is a folder in the linux folder-tree.
    It is a door in which you can see that partition or HDD.
    So /dev/hda is the mount folder for the HDD hda.
    And hda1 means the first partition on hda.
    And so on for hdb, hdc, etc.
    In partitioner you can see which partitions are mounted on which folder.

    / is the root folder of the folder tree, and is no mountpoint.
    So you must see the difference between mount-folder and folder or HDD.
    Normally the root-folder or / is on hda1.
    But it could also be on hda3 or hda8 if you use multiboot.

    The home-folder is usually on a different partition.
    It could be hda2 or hda3.
    If you have further HDDs they should also have mountpoints for instance /dev/hdb1.
    In partitioner you must see this mountpoint or fill it in.
    After that you can mount it or automount it.
    Also you can see what folders are on that particular partition.

    If you download files, first select where you want them to be downloaded.
    So in what folder or partition or HDD.

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    Quote Originally Posted by linuxforever View Post
    A mountpoint is a folder in the linux folder-tree.
    It is a door in which you can see that partition or HDD.
    So /dev/hda is the mount folder for the HDD hda.
    And hda1 means the first partition on hda.
    And so on for hdb, hdc, etc.
    In partitioner you can see which partitions are mounted on which folder.

    / is the root folder of the folder tree, and is no mountpoint.
    So you must see the difference between mount-folder and folder or HDD.
    Normally the root-folder or / is on hda1.
    But it could also be on hda3 or hda8 if you use multiboot.

    The home-folder is usually on a different partition.
    It could be hda2 or hda3.
    If you have further HDDs they should also have mountpoints for instance /dev/hdb1.
    In partitioner you must see this mountpoint or fill it in.
    After that you can mount it or automount it.
    Also you can see what folders are on that particular partition.

    If you download files, first select where you want them to be downloaded.
    So in what folder or partition or HDD.
    Very many thanks for your explanation. It's the first time I've seen such a clear and straightforward explanation of what was puzzling me! If only all explanations were as clear! As usual, it's not hard to grasp a simple idea when it's explained properly. (End of gripe)

    I think now I have enough knowhow to take me onwards, so I'll have a go soon.

    Thanks again

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    fdisk -l

    and
    mount

    and
    df

    Then we could give you better advice.

    You are possible running out of space on the root partition which usually also contains /tmp. But also you normally don't get a warning, general things just lockup.

    You could move the mount point of /tmp to a spare partition that would give you some more room.

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