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I have already installed OpenSUSE 11.4 at my laptop. There are 3 Linux partitions at the very end of the harddisk: dev/sda1 . . dev/sda12 are all Windows partitions dev/sda13 ...
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  1. #1
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    Post Using Gparted to move and enlarge Linux partitions after installation


    I have already installed OpenSUSE 11.4 at my laptop. There are 3 Linux partitions at the very end of the harddisk:

    dev/sda1
    .
    .
    dev/sda12 are all Windows partitions

    dev/sda13 : OpenSUSE and boot folder here
    dev/sda14 : Swap
    dev/sda15 : Home mounted here


    Boot happens form a W95 extended partition.

    I want to shrink the Windows partitions, free space and move back (to left) the Linux partitions. Do you think that Gparted can do this without corrupting the Linux system ?!

    Is it safe to move back the Linux partition where the system and boot folder reside ?!

    One more question about Clonezella, is it reliable ?! Is there a better software ?!

  2. #2
    oz
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    Gparted is an excellent tool for working with partitions and it should be able to do what you want but as always, it's highly advisable to have backups of any important data just in case anything should go wrong. Remember that if you change the numbering of the partitions you'll need to edit your fstab and bootloader configuration files accordingly. To expand any partition, you must have unallocated space right next to it. From what I can gather by your post, the task might entail quite a bit of work, but gparted should be able to get the job done.

    For system imaging/backups, Clonezilla has worked very well for me every time that I've used it. I personally prefer FSArchiver because it allows you to restore backups to smaller drives or partitions, if needed. Neither of them are simple to use if you aren't familiar with them, but they don't take long to learn enough to use them. Acronis True Image has a bootable CD version of their product that is Linux based and it has a GUI. It works well, but you have to have a license for their product to download and use it.
    oz

  3. #3
    oz
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    Just wanted to quickly add that the easiest way to use and be successful with gparted is to use it from a liveCD environment such as the Parted Magic liveCD. That way, none of the partitions that you are wanting to work with will be mounted.
    oz

  4. #4
    Linux Enthusiast Mudgen's Avatar
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    Glad you added that, Oz. There's a Gparted-dedicated boot iso on Sourceforge:
    GParted -- Live CD/USB/PXE/HD

    Gparted can definitely do this, but you'll need to map out what you want to do and work partition by partition in my experience. And defrag the dickens out of the Windows partitions before you start resizing.

  5. #5
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    Thanks very much for the valuable information. I think I can now safely start doing the resizing and moving. I did not know that Acronis True Images works with Linux partitions. The thing is that one of the to-be moved partitions is Ext4 FS, so I will use a more Linux based image creator such as Clonezilla.

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