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Hello I open the /boot/grub/grub.cfg and see entry relating to Suse Linux.That is shown in this picture : grubcfg.jpg I run the sudo update-grub command and I post the results ...
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  1. #21
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    Hello
    I open the /boot/grub/grub.cfg and see entry relating to Suse Linux.That is shown in this picture :
    grubcfg.jpg
    I run the sudo update-grub command and I post the results from the terminal here :
    sudo.jpg
    For continue,what am I do?

  2. #22
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    The only thing I see is this line in your Suse Linux grub.cfg entry: initr (hd0,0) That should be initrd (hd0,1) since Grub2 counts partitions from one (1) not zero.
    Are you still getting the same error as previously when you try to boot?
    If the above change doesn't work, google bootinfoscript, go to the website, read the documentation, download and run it and post it here as it will give a lot more info on your boot files, partition and other information.

  3. #23
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    hello
    thaks a lot
    Result of my sudo command is attached to post.
    Attached Files Attached Files

  4. #24
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    I haven't used the most recent version of Grub2 you have on Ubuntu. Did you make any changes manually in the grub.cfg file? The entry for Suse Linux just doesn't look right. Compare it to the Ubuntu entry. In the menuentry for Suse, remove the (hd0,0) after initrd. That is not needed and is incorrect anyway.

    It doesn't appear that your bootinfoscript ran properly, unless you removed some info before posting. It doesn't show UUID for all partitions for one thing. In the bootinfoscript near the bottom you have /etc/fstab output and it tells you a command to get UUID numbers. Run that and compare the output for sda1 to the entry for your Suse Linux menu entry linux line. Otherwise, run the bootinfoscript again and see if you get more output.

    Your Suse Linux menuentry linux line is very different from the Ubuntu. I don't know if that is correct as Ubuntu has made changes in the most recent version of Grub2 and I don't have an Suse install to compare it to. It does seem to have the disk Name twice whereas the Ubuntu entry only has the UUID.

    Did you change the initrd entry I suggested above? Did you install and/or run os-prober from Ubuntu? I don't see anything else. If this doesn't resolve, you might try starting a new post "can't boot suse linux from Ubuntu" under the Ubuntu section here at the forums. I'm not familiar with the newest release of Grub2 and don't have Suse installed. Still, I'm surprised your Suse install was not detected, both the older and newer Grub versions have always been very good at it.

    I would also suggest that when you are making changes in your boot files, you keep notes as to exactly what you are changing. If you make a change and it doesn't accomplish your goal and you can change back.

  5. #25
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    I didn'n make any changes manually in the grub.cfg file.
    I remove the (hd0,0) after initrd,But can not be saved.
    I run the bootinfoscript again and see didn't get me more output.
    Thanks anyway...

  6. #26
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    If you understand anything else,help me please.

  7. #27
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    I didn'n make any changes manually in the grub.cfg file.
    The reason I asked that is because the Grub2 bootloader on Ubuntu counts partitions beginning with one (1) and your initrd line says "initrd (hd0,0). The lowest possible accurate number would be (hd0,1). Don't know where that came from??

    You must be logged in as administrator/root user to make changes to system files such as grub.cfg. You can open a terminal and type "gksu nautilus" (without quotes) and it should open a file manager. If that fails type "sudo su" hit the enter key, enter your user password when prompted and then type "nautilus" to open the file manager and navigate to the /boot/grub/grub.cfg file where you can make and save the changes.

    Did you ever run sudo os-prober?
    What happened?
    Did you run the command I suggested above to compare UUID numbers for your partitions?

  8. #28
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    I can edit my grub.cfg and delete (hd0,0).
    But can not run os-proper command.Terminal tell me command not found.
    And can not run sudo apt-get install os-prober.Terminal tell me Unable to locate package os-proper.

  9. #29
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    I don't understand how run /etc/fstab to earn UUID.
    Please help me...

  10. #30
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    And can not run sudo apt-get install os-prober.Terminal tell me Unable to locate package os-proper.
    I don't know why it wouldn't install. You do need to spell it exactly. You might check your repositories or try finding it in Synaptic Package Manager, I think it is under the System tab on the Ubuntu Desktop.

    To compare the uuid run in a terminal; sudo blkid

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