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I messed up with my install of openSuSE. I wanted to boot from sda1, but instead, my boot is from sda5 (my /). I can live with this setup, and ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined! graphicks's Avatar
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    Changing boot partition


    I messed up with my install of openSuSE. I wanted to boot from sda1, but instead, my boot is from sda5 (my /). I can live with this setup, and I didn't realize it until I had spent considerable time with installation of files and configuration of the system.

    If I choose to attempt a change, I'm wondering what chances I have of breaking the system. What I'd intend to do:
    1.) fdisk to make sda1 bootable
    2.) change fstab for sda1 as /boot
    3.) copy everything from my current /boot to sda1
    4.) verify and correct grub for correct location of kernel

    Any problems with my steps? What chance of success do I have?

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    I doubt you need to mark sda1 as bootable, grub should work anyway.
    I'd use cp -a when copying /boot information
    You should be able to get it to boot ... and even if you fail first time you can always boot from a live CD and fix it

  3. #3
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    Is there any specific reason for using first partition as /boot only?
    If I choose to attempt a change, I'm wondering what chances I have of breaking the system. What I'd intend to do:
    1.) fdisk to make sda1 bootable
    2.) change fstab for sda1 as /boot
    3.) copy everything from my current /boot to sda1
    4.) verify and correct grub for correct location of kernel
    It should work fine. You can skip first step. Boot flag is not necessary in Linux. Its a Windows thing. If you have installed Boot Loader properly and its conf files are configured and pointing available kernel correctly then You can boot up from any partition.
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  4. #4
    Just Joined! graphicks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by devils casper View Post
    Is there any specific reason for using first partition as /boot only?
    None other than personal preference. I have three partitions for OS, plus one /home partition, in addition to the first partition I want to use for /boot. I'm trying share /home and /boot among all OS. I just like to play around with different distros all the time.

    Busy day at work yesterday kept me from checking on here until now. I appreciate the responses. I was not aware that setting boot flag was not needed. Even Gentoo's documentation states to set it. I'm sure they just want to make things work among all scenarios. I won't be using Windows anyway. I scrapped Windows 7 for the setup I have now. I won't go back unless I'm forced.

    Thanks again,
    Greg

  5. #5
    Linux Newbie
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    You can always change Your boot via Yast and boot options.

  6. #6
    Just Joined! graphicks's Avatar
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    As it turns out, I was changing the partition sizes on sda in order to do what I wanted, when the partition table was lost. First time I lost anything with partitioning, but I had it all backed up. Now I have it all set up the way I want. The big problem is that I have to start over with my Gentoo installation. Good thing I like to do this stuff.

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