Find the answer to your Linux question:
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 12 of 12
Like Tree1Likes
Originally Posted by Dapper Dan If the disk is unmounted then files will be copied into /media/disk and not onto the disk, I had this happen once before. I've been ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #11
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    221

    Quote Originally Posted by Dapper Dan View Post
    If the disk is unmounted then files will be copied into /media/disk and not onto the disk, I had this happen once before. I've been puzzling over why your /etc/fstab shows the WD drive mounted to "/." I don't see anything wrong with using an external USB drive as a backup but you might consider doing it "by hand" to ensure everything is working right. Setting it up as a cron job process is exactly how I wound up having files copied to the directory and not the device that was supposed to be mounted. If you have another server, then copying the files via scp would be a good option too.
    I am puzzled too with what /etc/fstab has for my WD external. I recall setting up this WD (to work with Linux) in Partitioner back in 2006. I never had to manually mount it until this thread. It always mounted automatically when it was plugged in. A few times I had to clear out /media/disk due to backing up occurring while it somehow was unmounted.

    I am not sure why its swap either.

    Quote Originally Posted by chiranjeevis View Post
    Remove the /media/disk and then insert the usb drive.

    It will automatically remounts the drive.

    The things will be happen without using the umount and when the data needs to be written in the drive.

    When u used the unmount volume on the GUI, a message will be there stating that "It's safe to remove the drive" and then u need to remove the drive.
    This is the way I have always mounted the WD external. Just plug in the USB cable and let it auto mount. Not sure why its broken now.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mudgen View Post
    Don't you hate it when you type a great answer and post it, only to see that someone else posted it while you were typing? Happens to me, too.

    Mike, there are a number of ways to check in the script as to whether the filesystem is mounted. I generally do two tests:
    --I can grep the mount point in output from "mount" command
    --A persistent reference file from the backup exists on the mount point. I always do a "echo `/bin/date` > /rsync.time" at the top of the script, which lends itself to other purposes like dating the backup.

    Whether copying locally or to another server, I like rsync rather than cp, scp, etc. It uses a sliding window block checksum mechanism that lets it transfer only the changed blocks in the backup files, which can save a lot of time and bandwidth. If I need a retention cycle for multiple backups, I manage that with tar on the backup target, after the backup.

    I use rsync (setup as a CRON job) to back up my web root to the USB external. I also rsync (another CRON) over SSH to an offsite server running as a Virtual Box VM (been having issues with this for last two months where both the offsite VM and my onsite server connected to USB external will freeze - that's another issue I am pursuing).

    In conclusion I am not sure why the external does not auto mount anymore. At this stage of the game, should I wipe the drive clean in Partitioner (after backing up files) and start with a newly formatted external drive?

    Thank you everyone (Dapper Dan, Mudgen, Chiranjeevis) for all of your input!!
    Suse Linux Enterprise Server 11
    Suse Linux Enterprise Server 10 - SP3
    OpenSuse 11.2, KDE 4.3.1

  2. #12
    Linux Enthusiast Mudgen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    664
    It didn't go flaky for no reason. There are either filesystem issues, media (e.g. bad block) issues, or drive mechanics/electronics issues. If it's filesystem corruption, what you propose would fix it, but it's likely so would unmounting it and doing "e2fsck -y" on the partition. "e2fsck -c" would take a long time on that device, but would identify any bad blocks and add them to the bad block map. Finding and running the mfr drive diagnostics, if any, may turn up any mechanics/electronics issues, but the drive is toast and should be replaced if those exist.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •