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Hello, I have a weird problem that just surfaced recently. I keep getting warnings about having low disk space on my root filesystem. I checked it out in Gnome System ...
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  1. #1
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    Disk Usage Problem


    Hello,

    I have a weird problem that just surfaced recently. I keep getting warnings about having low disk space on my root filesystem. I checked it out in Gnome System Monitor and it is showing 99% usage. When I use baobab (Disk Usage Analyzer) to find out which files are causing the problem, it seems to indicate that there is a lot less usage than the gnome system monitor is reporting.

    Does anyone know what could cause this behavior? Is my disk really that low on space or is gnome confused? If I am out of space, how can I find out what is taking up the space?

    I am running OpenSUSE 12.1, the root drive is 60GB large, gnome system monitor is reporting 55.0GB total, 2.0GB free, 250.1MB available, baobab reports 13.7GB used (this is almost exactly the usage I expect and was seeing before this started happening). I will post screenshots of gnome system monitor and baobab output when I figure out how to (I get a blank page when I click "Manage Attachments").

    thanks,
    Max

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer
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    Hello,

    On typical installations (I'm not 100% about suse), it's generally accepted to have / and /home mounted on different partitions. Did you perhaps partition your drive during installation?
    Run in terminal:
    mount
    That will tell you if your drive was partitioned. Here's what my output looks like (minus some other entries that aren't relevant to what we're discussing here)
    /dev/sda6 on / type ext4 (rw,errors=remount-ro,commit=0)
    /dev/sda7 on /home type ext3 (rw,commit=0)

    If your out put has separate entries form / and /home (/boot and /var are also popular to have on separate partitions) then you likely need to increase the size of your root partition.
    to see the free space on each partition:
    df -h

    Anyway, hope that helps.
    Last edited by mizzle; 04-24-2012 at 11:58 PM. Reason: Not sure where I got "USB drive from"

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by mizzle View Post
    Hello,

    On typical installations (I'm not 100% about suse), it's generally accepted to have / and /home mounted on different partitions. Did you perhaps partition your drive during installation?
    Run in terminal:
    mount
    That will tell you if your drive was partitioned. Here's what my output looks like (minus some other entries that aren't relevant to what we're discussing here)
    /dev/sda6 on / type ext4 (rw,errors=remount-ro,commit=0)
    /dev/sda7 on /home type ext3 (rw,commit=0)

    If your out put has separate entries form / and /home (/boot and /var are also popular to have on separate partitions) then you likely need to increase the size of your root partition.
    to see the free space on each partition:
    df -h

    Anyway, hope that helps.
    Hi,

    I did the partitioning myself on that drive, its a monolithic ext4, everything is on one partition.

    thanks for your response,
    Max

  4. #4
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    Screenshot at 2012-04-24 16-27-57.jpgScreenshot at 2012-04-24 16-27-50.jpg

    I was able to figure out how to upload the screenshots I took, any help is appreciated

    thanks,
    Max

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