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Hi all. I am pretty new to Linux and I have run out of space on one of my partitions it seems. I am running on a Virtual Machine. So ...
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  1. #1
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    Extend volume for partition


    Hi all.

    I am pretty new to Linux and I have run out of space on one of my partitions it seems. I am running on a Virtual Machine. So what can I do to increase the volume on the root partition or to give me more space that I can work with (should I have a /usr partition?).

    Code:
    TDExpress14.0_Sles10:~ # cat /etc/*-release
    LSB_VERSION="core-2.0-noarch:core-3.0-noarch:core-2.0-x86_64:core-3.0-x86_64"
    SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10 (x86_64)
    VERSION = 10
    PATCHLEVEL = 3
    
    TDExpress14.0_Sles10:~ # df
    Filesystem           1K-blocks      Used Available Use% Mounted on
    /dev/sda2              9076396   8574624     40708 100% /
    udev                    944244       132    944112   1% /dev
    /dev/sda5              2016016    342792   1570812  18% /var
    /dev/sda7             37293996   4167992  31231544  12% /var/opt/teradata
    /dev/sda3              9076396    231700   8383632   3% /data
    Last edited by ronstoppable; 07-26-2012 at 04:09 PM.

  2. #2
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    This is how I have done it in the past. There are other ways to do it, but I had the most success with this one especially with the / partition since it is always mounted
    **Note: you may need to shut the VM down to be able to expand the size of the drive**
    1. Go to the VM and change the hard drive to the size you need
    2. Reboot the machine with a Live CD
    3. Open the Disk utility and create a partition in the free space
    4. Determine the name of the newly created partition from the Disk Utility
    5. Get the name of the volume group
    a. vgdisplay
    6. Join the newly created partition to the volume group
    a. vgextend volume_group_name /dev/sda3 - note this is the name you gathered from Disk Utility
    7. Extend the logical volume
    a. Lvextend -L{size volume will be} /dev/volume_group_name/logical_volume_name
    b. E2fsck -f /dev/volume_group_name/logical_volume_name
    c. Resize2fs /dev/volume_group_name/logical_volume_name

    Another good walkthrough is this:
    Extending partitions on Linux VMware virtual machines | TechRepublic
    ronstoppable likes this.

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the post.

    The step that I am stuck at is:

    2. Reboot the machine with a Live CD
    I dont have any CD. I downloaded the VM from the internet so I have no Linux install CD's or boot CD's.

    Also I tried following the guide on the link

    13.Type n to add a new partition
    I am getting
    Code:
    Command (m for help): n
    No free sectors available
    This might be okay. Maybe I added the extra volume before when I was playing around. So I continued with the guide. But when I get to this step:

    22.Now you’ll add the physical volume to the existing volume group using the vgextend command. First type df -h to find the name of the volume group. In Figure C, the name of the volume group is vg_root. Now type vgextend [volume group] /dev/sdaX. (ex: vgextend vg_root /dev/sda4)
    I cant find the name of the volume group that I want to extend.

    Maybe this will give more info that might help.

    Code:
    TDExpress14.0_Sles10:~ # fdisk -l
    
    Disk /dev/sda: 78.3 GB, 78383153152 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 9529 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sda1               1           6       48163+  12  Compaq diagnostics
    /dev/sda2   *           7        1154     9221310   83  Linux
    /dev/sda3            1155        2302     9221310   83  Linux
    /dev/sda4            2303        9529    58050877+   5  Extended
    /dev/sda5            2303        2557     2048256   83  Linux
    /dev/sda6            2558        2812     2048256   8e  Linux LVM
    /dev/sda7            2813        7529    37889271   83  Linux
    /dev/sda8            7530        9529    16064968+  82  Linux swap / Solaris
    
    Disk /dev/sdb: 4294 MB, 4294967296 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 522 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sdb1               1         261     2096451   da  Non-FS data
    
    Disk /dev/sdc: 4294 MB, 4294967296 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 522 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sdc1               1         261     2096451   da  Non-FS data
    
    TDExpress14.0_Sles10:~ # vgdisplay
      No volume groups found
    
    TDExpress14.0_Sles10:~ # lvdisplay
      No volume groups found

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  5. #4
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    It looks like you added a second hard drive in the VM. If you are new to Linux, this will be easier to do from a live CD using GParted. I would download an ISO of Ubuntu, then in your VMWare settings for the machine, go to CD/DVD drive and select datastore ISO file and click browse to find it. Once you have ubuntu running on a live CD install GParted and that will help you with a graphical interface to show you what it you partition table is.
    cd-dvd_settings_vmware.jpg

  6. #5
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    Thanks. I will try that on Monday. Have a nice weekend!

  7. #6
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    Let me know if you need help

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