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I'm trying to install linneighborhood by copying it to the /usr/bin directory as directed in the FAQ I'm using KDE's myComputer but it says "access denied". Is there a way ...
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  1. #1
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    installing linneighborhood


    I'm trying to install linneighborhood by copying it to the /usr/bin directory as directed in the FAQ I'm using KDE's myComputer but it says "access denied". Is there a way to open myComputer as the root user or is there a better way to accomplish this?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Cabhan's Avatar
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    /usr/bin is only writable by root, I believe.

    Did you compile it from source? If so, running the
    Code:
    make install
    command in the source directory should install it automatically for you...

    Either way, you'll need to be root in order to copy it to /usr/bin.

  3. #3
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    Thanks for responding...

    I'm really new at this, so when you say run as root, I'm not sure how to accomplish that. I boot up and no login is required to enter KDE. Some things I try to do require a user: root and the password, but this isn't asking me for that.

    I downloaded a binary file (cus I don't know how to compile). I can see the file tree in myComputer (KDE):

    /home/insight/bin/LinNeighborhood-0.6.2.glibc-static-i386

    but if I try to move it to usr/bin there's the international NO symbol over the directory folder. It doesn't give me an option to login as root.

  4. #4
    Linux User IsaacKuo's Avatar
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    Linneighborhood is touchy and not very user friendly, and not integrated with KDE.

    I'd suggest you use smb4k instead. The way smb4k works is very much like Windows's My Network Places. You just point and click on stuff and it more or less just works. It's a fully integrated KDE application.
    Isaac Kuo, ICQ 29055726 or Yahoo mechdan

  5. #5
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    Thanks. I've got SMB4k working.

    I'd still like to know how to copy files to the root directory. I'm sure this type of issue will come up again.

  6. #6
    Linux Guru Cabhan's Avatar
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    Okay.

    root is the administrator account. You probably know that already.

    Now then, if you open up a terminal and use the "su" command, you can switch users in that terminal. "su" with no arguments will make you root. So for example:

    Code:
    su
    << root Password >>
    And now you're root! You should never operate in this mode because root has no restrictions. If you for some reason type "rm -rf *", you can easily wipe out tons of important files.

    However, some operations require root abilities. So to move that file, you would do:

    Code:
    su                                      <-- Become root
    << root Password >>
    cp the_file /usr/bin/     <-- Copy the File to /usr/bin/
    exit                                   <-- Return to Your Regular Account
    Okie dokie?

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