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Originally Posted by dwbell I believe you just installed suse today/yesterday and it is a one os machine now. if that's right I think you should wipe the drive, completely. ...
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  1. #11
    Linux Engineer oldcpu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwbell
    I believe you just installed suse today/yesterday and it is a one os machine now. if that's right I think you should wipe the drive, completely. Partitions and all (there seems to be something weird with the way they are layed out, but i'm too tired to be sure or explain right now) Then reinstall and use the suse installer to partition.
    I am of the same opinion. Either LordG is exaggerating in his complaints, or there is something seriously wrong with his SuSE. Frankly, I think he is exaggerating, and he is showing a lack of understanding of the way a good OS should operate.

    Quote Originally Posted by LordG
    I have to enter a password to adjust the clock
    This is standard. Changing the time of a file NOT the sort of activity that every user should be able to do. This SHOULD be password protected. Your changing of the system time has system wide implications.
    Quote Originally Posted by LordG
    I have to enter a password to copy a file to a folder
    Only if you are trying to copy the file to a folder where you should NOT be copying the file. If you go copying files "willy-nilly" to just any directory, you will screw up your system. Now Bill Gate's MS-Window's programmers went and created registeries, and hidden files to protect against users doing things like this. And while Linux has some "hidden files", the main way Linux protects against users trying to copy files to incorrect directories is through proper permissions.
    Quote Originally Posted by LordG
    I have enter a password to adjust minor system settings
    My apologies for being critical, but quite frankly, I don't think you know enough about Linux to know what is minor and what is major.
    Quote Originally Posted by LordG
    I have to enter a password to sign in to msn
    MSN ?? Microsoft, right? ... What application are you using to try and sign in?
    Quote Originally Posted by LordG
    I have to enter a password to change a small desktop setting
    If a password is required (for the desktop), it is because what you are trying to change will impact more than just "your desktop". It has system level implications, and it is password protected to stop you from "willy-nilly" changing things.

    Quote Originally Posted by LordG
    I am not that paranoid that I need this level of security, the only reason I got Linux is because its free and not for the security.
    This is not about paranoia. It is about a solid operating system.

    Using Linux only because it is "FREE" is the wrong reason for using Linux. IMHO if you don't like the security of a solid OS such as Linux, then I recommend you go back to MS-Windows.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldcpu
    I am of the same opinion. Either LordG is exaggerating in his complaints, or there is something seriously wrong with his SuSE. Frankly, I think he is exaggerating, and he is showing a lack of understanding of the way a good OS should operate.

    This is standard. Changing the time of a file NOT the sort of activity that every user should be able to do. This SHOULD be password protected. Your changing of the system time has system wide implications.
    I thought LordG was talking about making changes to the way the clock was displayed as I explained how to bring the clock back and configure. Don't remember if it was this thread or another

    I wouldn't recommend giving up on Linux because of one day of frustration / lack of understanding. It took me about 3 days and many attempts to get a working install of linux. It was months of dual booting before I understood the security / root aspects.

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