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Why is it that I have no access to folders inside the root directory? Sure I can see them and browse but I cant copy files for example I want ...
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  1. #1
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    I have no access!


    Why is it that I have no access to folders inside the root directory? Sure I can see them and browse but I cant copy files for example I want to add my favourites from IE to mozilla folder but it wont let me and I cant even open the root folder.

  2. #2
    Linux User yourname3232's Avatar
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    Because of the way permissions work on linux you can only access files you "own". If you login as root (not a good practice) or you use the command line as root you should be able to copy everything just fine.
    Registered GNU/Linux User #399198
    'Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it.' -Steven Wright

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by yourname3232
    Because of the way permissions work on linux you can only access files you "own". If you login as root (not a good practice) or you use the command line as root you should be able to copy everything just fine.
    This is driving my crazy I am so sick of having to enter my password. How do I gain complete access to everything. I tried logging in as root but it doesent let me.

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    having to enter your password is what makes linux secure. without root access you, some sitting at your computer or a virus can not hose your system (without the root password) if you want access to everything, at a command line type su enter your password and leave the terminal open. anything you then do via command line has root access. Or in the K Menu -> system -> File Manager there is a choice of 'Super User mode' this will open konqueror with root privleges (sp?).

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    Quote Originally Posted by dwbell
    having to enter your password is what makes linux secure. without root access you, some sitting at your computer or a virus can not hose your system (without the root password) if you want access to everything, at a command line type su enter your password and leave the terminal open. anything you then do via command line has root access. Or in the K Menu -> system -> File Manager there is a choice of 'Super User mode' this will open konqueror with root privleges (sp?).
    but surely you should be able to copy a simple file without having to enter your password.

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    You could log in as root at the login screen i.e username:root password:enterpasswordhere, but as previously posted, this is not good practice not only for security reasons but it stops us noobies modifying, moving or deleting files that we really shouldn't be playing with. When you start typing long winded command into the console you realise that a simple / in the wrong place can have devestating effects.

    You do have the option of changing the file permissions using chmod which can allow certain users or groups to have read/write access but I dont know enough about it to give you an indepth tutorial but there will be plenty on the boards to help you. Just dont make system critical files available to everyone!

    Good Luck

  8. #7
    Just Joined! MrSpandex's Avatar
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    You do not have to log in for everything, only for files that affect other users or that are essential to the system. /home/you files do not need logins. As said above, this is to protect your system and is one of the best features of Linux.

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by LordG
    but surely you should be able to copy a simple file without having to enter your password.
    No you shouldn't. The idea is to prevent anybody from accessing files that only belong to root. If you want those files, you have to login as root. If you do not want to type root password, then don't save the files in root directory. Save the files in /home/user directory.

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrSpandex
    You do not have to log in for everything, only for files that affect other users or that are essential to the system. /home/you files do not need logins. As said above, this is to protect your system and is one of the best features of Linux.
    I have to enter a password to adjust the clock
    I have to enter a password to copy a file to a folder
    I have enter a password to adjust minor system settings
    I have to enter a password to sign in to msn
    I have to enter a password to change a small desktop setting

    I am not that paranoid that I need this level of security, the only reason I got Linux is because its free and not for the security.

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by LordG
    I have to enter a password to adjust the clock
    I have to enter a password to copy a file to a folder
    I have enter a password to adjust minor system settings
    I have to enter a password to sign in to msn
    I have to enter a password to change a small desktop setting

    I am not that paranoid that I need this level of security, the only reason I got Linux is because its free and not for the security.
    I'm not sure what's going on, i've been watching a few of your threads here, If you have to enter a password to adjust the clock something is really setup wrong. I believe you just installed suse today/yesterday and it is a one os machine now. if that's right I think you should wipe the drive, completely. Partitions and all (there seems to be something weird with the way they are layed out, but i'm too tired to be sure or explain right now) Then reinstall and use the suse installer to partition.

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