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I'm on Suse 9.3 and it doesn't boot anymore after I changed the motherboard . It says smth. like : "cannot find hdb1 ignoring" "cannot find hdb2 ignoring " and ...
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  1. #1
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    moteherboard changed => doesn't boot


    I'm on Suse 9.3 and it doesn't boot anymore after I changed the motherboard . It says smth. like : "cannot find hdb1 ignoring" "cannot find hdb2 ignoring " and somth about not finding the tty and it gives me a shell where no common command works . what should I do for it to boot ?

  2. #2
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    Have you tried booting up with the #1 installation disk?

    I think the route is
    installation >repair >repair bootloader
    Not sure if this is exactly right so do a little checking.
    It's worth a shot.
    WARNING: I may be telling you more than I know !

  3. #3
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    This is not my area of expertise - not that I have one! - but wouldnt something as fundamental as fitting a new motherboard dictate a fresh install?

    Anyone knowledgable about this?

  4. #4
    Banned CodeRoot's Avatar
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    First, go into your BIOS setup [manager?] and make sure your drives are set up so that PRIMARY/SECONDARY MASTER/SLAVE arrangement matches what it was before you changed the mother board. Also, make sure that the "first boot" drive MBR is correct.

    hdb => PRIMARY SLAVE

    Try that and post your results/success...

    EDIT: Doing an install/repair could prove worthwhile, too -- it may fix it for you, depending on what is actually needed...

  5. #5
    Linux Enthusiast deltaflyer's Avatar
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    with a new motherboard it is best to reinstall,so that you do not have these problems.as coderoot said it *might* fix the problem using the repair facility

    andy
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  6. #6
    Banned CodeRoot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ipsofacto
    This is not my area of expertise - not that I have one! - but wouldnt something as fundamental as fitting a new motherboard dictate a fresh install?

    Anyone knowledgable about this?
    It depends...

    In most cases (depending on what kind of hardware changes are made), a new install should not be necessary - a reconfiguration of the currently installed system should be sufficient -- if the changes are not "too severe", the BIOS and Linux will automatically do at least some of it on the fly... A good example of "too severe" would be an upgrade to newer-technology hardware that required a different kernel.

    In some cases, an "upgrade install" would be sufficient -- in which case some modules/drivers/libraries/etc. may be added/changed... (same kernel/system [lightly or heavily] "tweaked")

    Of course, one could "play it safe" by backing up data and doing a "fresh" install (which I take to mean "written over from scratch" or "a complete replacement") - followed by a replacement of configuration files, etc...

    EDIT: In some cases, I agree with deltaflyer -- it largely depends on how much work is required to restore the user customizations (and data) after the new install. If there are few/small differences between the initial/default install and the desired end result - or if it can be easily accomplished - or if you just want the extra experience setting up a Linux system - then it is definitely worth it to re-install...

  7. #7
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    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by CodeRoot
    it largely depends on how much work is required to restore the user customizations (and data) after the new install. If there are few/small differences between the initial/default install and the desired end result - or if it can be easily accomplished - or if you just want the extra experience setting up a Linux system - then it is definitely worth it to re-install...
    Thanks for your info Coderoot. I would add also there is also the extra knowledge to be gained in getting your hands dirty with tweaking the kernel cos you make it sound so easy! Not for this poster !!!

  8. #8
    Linux Guru budman7's Avatar
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    I recently replaced my mobo, even though it was the same model, none of the distros I was using were recognized.
    Doing a repair, as suggested above of Suse(where I had grub configured) solved all my problems.
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    when you respond to "get a life!" with "what's the URL?"
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  9. #9
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    I fixed the boot problem with the installation cd #1 , but now my X server doesn;t start anymore , probably because the new motherboard has an integrated video card . I ran repair again, but it still doesn't work . Does anyone know what I could do to fix the graphic mode ?

  10. #10
    Banned CodeRoot's Avatar
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    If you mean you also have a video card installed (in a slot) that you want to use, then the first thing you should probably do is go into your BIOS setup manager and see if you can disable the on-board video card. Then, boot SuSE and run 'sax2'...

    If you do not have other video hardware installed, and want to use the on-board video, then just boot SuSE and run 'sax2'...

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