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I am fairly new at linux and I would like to run Ubuntu and SuSE on the same machine. I have tried a couple of times, but I don't seem ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined! SamTheMan's Avatar
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    SuSE and Ubuntu dual boot


    I am fairly new at linux and I would like to run Ubuntu and SuSE on the same machine. I have tried a couple of times, but I don't seem to fully understand partitions. Do I need SuSE installed first or do I need Ubuntu installed first. Does it matter? Please help me; I need a full walktrhrough. thanks.

  2. #2
    Just Joined! beginner's Avatar
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    try this

    Quote Originally Posted by SamTheMan
    I am fairly new at linux and I would like to run Ubuntu and SuSE on the same machine. I have tried a couple of times, but I don't seem to fully understand partitions. Do I need SuSE installed first or do I need Ubuntu installed first. Does it matter? Please help me; I need a full walktrhrough. thanks.

    ----------
    i did the same job in my system (Windows,Fedora and SuSE), and here are all that i had done:

    If you run Windows as well, the first thing is install windows and then others.

    i think it does not matter which one is installed first, but if i were you, i install SuSE and then make use of the Yast partitioner to resize the harddisk (it is graphical base so very easy). After that you can install Ubuntu.

    when you install Ubuntu, do not install the boot loader. You can config the SuSE's GRUB to run Ubuntu later.


    good luck,

  3. #3
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    The ubuntu install will reach a point where it asks to install GRUB to the mbr. Do not accept this option if you are installing ubuntu after Suse. Take the option of installing to ubuntu's root (or however the installer words this).

    The nice part about letting Suse control the mbr is you get to use this;
    http://www.math.ucla.edu/computing/d...1/ch07s05.html

    While doing a quick search to see what ubuntu uses for a bootloader, I came across this;
    http://forums.debian.net/viewtopic.p...08ff321e0b5d77
    Looks like that user was doing something wrong. Not likely you will have the same grief.

    With this setup you can simply use the primary partitions (there are 4 of them). Using one for each OS and one for the shared swap would leave one for future use. If you have a large hard drive think about leaving some space unpartitioned. If you want another type of partitioning scheme post back or do a bit of a search.

    btw: Good to see you got this working beginner!
    WARNING: I may be telling you more than I know !

  4. #4
    Just Joined! SamTheMan's Avatar
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    okay, thank you for telling me about the grub thingy, but how in the heck do I partition a disk? please help me i have no clue about what i'm doing

  5. #5
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    Where are you at right now?
    example: windows is using the whole disk
    or
    dual booting windows and suse, can't bear to lose present suse configuration
    or
    dual booting windows and some linux, don't mind losing the present linux

    I don't think anyone cares to write a manual covering every possible scenario. If you presently have windows and dispensable linux (or unallocated space) this should be easy.
    http://www-uxsup.csx.cam.ac.uk/pub/d....proposal.html
    That link shows the graphic partitioning tool. From what beginner posted it seems that you can simply tell suse not to take all the free space.
    Can someone confirm this? (Where are you beginner?)I partition with fdisk, so cannot state this as a positive fact.

    Anyway, a little more information please.
    WARNING: I may be telling you more than I know !

  6. #6
    Just Joined! beginner's Avatar
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    Yast Partitioner

    Yes, i have just resized my hard disk with Yast partitioner, so trust me!
    with this tool you can break the hard disk into partitions with your desire size easily!

    As Googled fist posted, you should tell us in which scenarios you are?

    many thanks to Googled fist, you help me a lot .

  7. #7
    Linux Guru budman7's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by googledfirst
    I don't think anyone cares to write a manual covering every possible scenario.
    Actually, cheetahman did just that. He even put the directions for using UBuntu to resize Windows if that is necessary.
    http://www.linuxforums.org/forum/lin...-computer.html
    How to know if you are a geek.
    when you respond to "get a life!" with "what's the URL?"
    - Birger

    New users read The FAQ

  8. #8
    Just Joined! SamTheMan's Avatar
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    Okay, I guess I should have been more specific. Right now I only have SuSE intalled. That's it. I would like to put Ubuntu on it as well. I don't care about Windows becuase it SUCKS!!!!

    So to clarify I only have SuSE installed.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by budman7
    Actually, cheetahman did just that. He even put the directions for using UBuntu to resize Windows if that is necessary.
    http://www.linuxforums.org/forum/lin...-computer.html
    Yeah, and I referred beginner to that link just a few days ago. Memory must be slipping.

    SamThe Man

    There is no one right way to partition a drive. Basically you can have 4 primary partitions, one of which can be treated as an extended partition if you wish. The simplest setup in this situation would be 3 partitions. One for Suse root, one for swap and one for Ubuntu root.
    The simplest way to get there would be a clean install of Suse. Swap can be created at the time Suse is installed. When installing Ubuntu do not create swap (it can share the existing swap partition) and place Ubuntu's bootloader to it's root , not to the MBR.
    After installing Ubuntu reboot to Suse and let it find Ubuntu as shown in the link I gave you earlier.

    There may be a way to resize the existing Suse, with some risk involved
    http://os.newsforge.com/print.pl?sid=06/01/10/1512214
    To get to the screen shown, Pop in CD1->installation->choose language->repair installed system->expert tools->start partitioning tool->resize
    This is not a method I have personally tried. It's possible Suse will complain.

    You might also want to read cheetahman's howto, maybe you prefer his method.
    WARNING: I may be telling you more than I know !

  10. #10
    Just Joined! SamTheMan's Avatar
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    Okay, thank you for all your help, like i said before, I'm just a newbee. This worked just fine so that's all that matters. thanks everyone

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