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Buddy of mine just set up a new Suse intallation and asked me to help him out. Seems that when we assign eth0 to a Dynamic address with the yast ...
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  1. #1
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    Question Static IP issues...


    Buddy of mine just set up a new Suse intallation and asked me to help him out.

    Seems that when we assign eth0 to a Dynamic address with the yast interface, the connection works fine. Gets an IP address, can ping outside sites (google) , firefox works fine, etc.

    When we try to swap it to a static IP, it seems like the card accepts it, but it wont let us outside the router. We can still connec to the router's interface, and see the router setup (web-based) but can't get past it, cant ping google anymore, etc...

    Anyone have any hints? I'm inclined to think that it's not the router's fault because with DHCP we can get out fine, and I wouldn't think that the router has any sort of configurations for what IPs can do what based on how they are given out.

    I did notice on the "basic" tab of the interface config yast thing that the default firewall zone for dynamic is "none", while the default zone for DHCP is "External". We tried swapping that out as well, but I'm not sure if the change was written tot he right config file, as I'm not sure where those config files are.

    (I am a total noob to suse, fairly adept at Fedora, RH and gentoo releases)

    thanks for any help.


  2. #2
    Just Joined! uxtico's Avatar
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    From what you're saying, I would only make sure that the name servers have been setup on your static settings. This would make sense considering that you can get to your router (prolly by typing out its ip-address) but not to google and stuff that relies on dns.

  3. #3
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    I understand.

    I tried to copy down all of the DNS info from when the connection was DHCP and entered it into the yast configuration tool. It looks the same.

    I guess I dont really understand how DNS works. If I put the DNS entries into the configuration, and I'm unable to ping one of those DNS entries, somethign isn't right, right?

    where does suse store this dns stuff? maybe I can compare dhcp to staic versions of those files..?

  4. #4
    Just Joined! uxtico's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fr1j0l3
    I understand.

    I tried to copy down all of the DNS info from when the connection was DHCP and entered it into the yast configuration tool. It looks the same.

    I guess I dont really understand how DNS works. If I put the DNS entries into the configuration, and I'm unable to ping one of those DNS entries, somethign isn't right, right?

    where does suse store this dns stuff? maybe I can compare dhcp to staic versions of those files..?
    You may not be able to ping the servers because they don't allow themselves to be pinged.

    Try pinging 216.109.112.135, which is yahoo.com, and see what happens. If you still can't get through, then we have a config issue with the routing (ip, subnet mask, gateway) If it works though, then we know it's a dns problem.

    By the way, have you tried rebooting since you made the chances? Believe it or not it works sometimes.

  5. #5
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    what modem/ router are you using.?

    On my Netgear ADSL router ( DG834) i have 2 DNS ip's
    I have to set DNS ip's to the same on both my windows and linux machine in order to connect.
    Of course the PC's must be on the same subnet and gateway.

    Good luck

  6. #6
    Linux Engineer rcgreen's Avatar
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    Your dns entries are in /etc/resolv.conf, and you do
    have to edit it manually when you have a static ip. It is also
    a good idea to chech the dhcp settings on the router. It has
    a range of addresses that it automatically assigns. Static ip
    addresses should be outside that range, to avoid conflict.

    For example, my router assigns addresses from
    192.168.1.100 upward, so any static addresses
    I want to assign, I use 192.168.1.2 192.168.1.3 etc.

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