Find the answer to your Linux question:
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19
Hi. I am dual booting Xubuntu 7.10 with Windows XP and I was wondering what format of file system I should use for the media/transfering partition. I know they both ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    15

    NTFS or FAT32


    Hi. I am dual booting Xubuntu 7.10 with Windows XP and I was wondering what format of file system I should use for the media/transfering partition. I know they both support FAT32 pretty good but it is unstable if there is a power surge, which I get a few of a year, but I am not to sure about NTFS and I was wondering if it would be a better format. If someone could get back to me that would be great.

  2. #2
    Trusted Penguin Dapper Dan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    The Sovereign State of South Carolina
    Posts
    4,630
    ntfs is a far better file system than fat 32 overall in Windows, but fat32 presents less challenges when using it to transfer files between Windows and Linux. With fat32, you should be alright as long as you are not storing important files to it, and only use it as a temporary "loading dock" between the two OS's.

    An important word of caution: NEVER cut huge amounts of info from fat 32 to paste in Linux or ntfs. ALWAYS use copy and paste. After the files are transfered, and are safe in a ntfs or Linux partition, you can go back and delete the files from the fat32 partition. You can loose very important files in the twinkling of an eye transferring them to or from a fat32 partition using cut and paste. This from someone who found out the hard way...
    Linux Mint + IceWM Registered: #371367 New Members: click here

  3. #3
    Just Joined! NickWelder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    44
    If NTFS is so much better, why doesn't Linux adapt to use it?

  4. #4
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Either at home or at work or down the pub
    Posts
    3,503
    Because ext3 is better still. And I suspect there are licensing issues. Although
    there are some distros that now offer native read / write of NTFS
    What do we want?
    Time machines!

    When do we want 'em?
    Doesn't really matter does it!?


    The Fifth Continent

  5. #5
    Linux Engineer RobinVossen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    1,429
    FAT32 also cant store files bigger then 4 Gigs if I recall correctly.
    And, NTFS isnt that great. It supports Compression/Encryption. The problem with that is that resizing might be Dangerous.
    If you want Compressiona dn Encryption why not pick Reiser4?
    I normaly run ReiserFS on my home.
    Ext3 on my root
    and ext2 on my boot

    but you dont really Notice it..
    Anyhow, hope that informed you
    New Users, please read this..
    Google first, then ask..

  6. #6
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Chandigarh, India
    Posts
    24,729
    According to NTFS-reszie developers, NTFS resizing is not dangerous at all. You dont have to defrag it before resizing. Partitioning and resizing tools take care of that.
    I prefer NTFS only and Linux supports NTFS read/write access pretty well.
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  7. #7
    Linux Engineer RobinVossen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    1,429
    Quote Originally Posted by devils_casper View Post
    According to NTFS-reszie developers, NTFS resizing is not dangerous at all.
    So, they never lost data by resizing NTFS?
    I did so.. :/ I used PartitionMagic.
    New Users, please read this..
    Google first, then ask..

  8. #8
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Chandigarh, India
    Posts
    24,729
    I dont trust Windows based packages and Partition Magic is one of the worst partition manager I have ever used. You should try Gprated or Parted Magic LiveCD.
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  9. #9
    Linux Engineer RobinVossen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    1,429
    I really liked Partition Magic before it became a Symantec Program.
    Now I always use Parted Magic or fdisk.

    And why you dont trust Windows Based Packages?
    Well if its random Freeware Id download from somewere Id not trust it aswell,
    But if I did pay for it I think I can trust it?

    Ah, well NTFS is history now for me
    100% Linux
    New Users, please read this..
    Google first, then ask..

  10. #10
    Just Joined! Filipet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    70
    Yea, GParted is pretty good. Going back to topic, zannemcaig, if you want to copy directly from your Windows XP NTFS partition here are the instructions:
    *Enable the universe repository and install the ntfs-config package. See Installing Software.
    *Click Applications → System Tools → NTFS Configuration Tool
    *The upcoming tool will detect NTFS partitions on your system. Check each partition you wish to access, and, if you wish to, click the mount directory to change it. When finished, click Apply.
    *On the next screen Enable write support for internal device will be selected by default. Click OK.

    Your NTFS drive will be now be available in the mount point you selected.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •