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Searched, but couldn't find specific reference. I have miraculously been able to install Hardy on a new [2nd], internal [E] drive, after having a "too large" partition for it. Managed ...
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  1. #1
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    Smile disk space problem


    Searched, but couldn't find specific reference. I have miraculously been able to install Hardy on a new [2nd], internal [E] drive, after having a "too large" partition for it. Managed to downsize the partition, and it installed without a hitch. It is an 80 GB drive, with very little in the way of data files on it.

    I'm completely rapt with Ubuntu, and the way, when I switch on, it gives me the selection screen to choose a version of Ubuntu or, at the bottom of the list, XP. [Is that the GRUB allowing that choice...just curious?]

    My problem is, I wanted to download Inkscape, but am getting this message:

    "There is not enough room on the disk to save /tmp/mSj1OWy7.part."

    Have I made the "system" partition too small? Have groped around in System areas, but can't see anything obvious.

    Under /dev/sdb1...as well as: gvfs-fuse-daemon/home/user.gvfs, I have listed:

    Total=2.8 GB
    Used=2.6GB

    I'm living on the edge, aren't I? Can someone walk me out of this? Bear in mind I'm on a fairly low level here...thanks.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    I'm completely rapt with Ubuntu, and the way, when I switch on, it gives me the selection screen to choose a version of Ubuntu or, at the bottom of the list, XP. [Is that the GRUB allowing that choice...just curious?]
    Yes. GRUB is default boot loader of most of Linux distros and takes care of dual/multibooting.

    "There is not enough room on the disk to save /tmp/mSj1OWy7.part."
    Execute this in Terminal :
    Code:
    sudo fdisk -l
    df -h
    sudo apt-get clean all
    df -h
    Post output here.
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  3. #3
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    sorry dc, here is output from 1st cmd. BTW, how do I exit terminal? Is it /quit? Embarrassed to ask!

    paul@paul-desktop:~$
    paul@paul-desktop:~$ sudo fdisk -l
    [sudo] password for paul:

    Disk /dev/sda: 80.0 GB, 80060424192 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 9733 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0xd5f7d5f7

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sda1 * 1 9733 78180291 c W95 FAT32 (LBA)

    Disk /dev/sdb: 80.0 GB, 80060424192 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 9733 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x97bab0c3

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sdb1 1 365 2931831 83 Linux
    /dev/sdb2 366 9733 75248460 82 Linux swap / Solaris

  4. $spacer_open
    $spacer_close
  5. #4
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    Full output here...


    paul@paul-desktop:~$
    paul@paul-desktop:~$ sudo fdisk -l
    [sudo] password for paul:

    Disk /dev/sda: 80.0 GB, 80060424192 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 9733 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0xd5f7d5f7

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sda1 * 1 9733 78180291 c W95 FAT32 (LBA)

    Disk /dev/sdb: 80.0 GB, 80060424192 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 9733 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x97bab0c3

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sdb1 1 365 2931831 83 Linux
    /dev/sdb2 366 9733 75248460 82 Linux swap / Solaris
    paul@paul-desktop:~$
    paul@paul-desktop:~$
    paul@paul-desktop:~$ df -h
    Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    /dev/sdb1 2.8G 2.7G 2.1M 100% /
    varrun 252M 100K 252M 1% /var/run
    varlock 252M 0 252M 0% /var/lock
    udev 252M 48K 252M 1% /dev
    devshm 252M 12K 252M 1% /dev/shm
    lrm 252M 38M 215M 15% /lib/modules/2.6.24-19-generic/volatile
    gvfs-fuse-daemon 2.8G 2.7G 2.1M 100% /home/paul/.gvfs
    paul@paul-desktop:~$ sudo apt -get clean all
    sudo: apt: command not found
    paul@paul-desktop:~$ df -h
    Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    /dev/sdb1 2.8G 2.7G 2.1M 100% /
    varrun 252M 100K 252M 1% /var/run
    varlock 252M 0 252M 0% /var/lock
    udev 252M 48K 252M 1% /dev
    devshm 252M 12K 252M 1% /dev/shm
    lrm 252M 38M 215M 15% /lib/modules/2.6.24-19-generic/volatile
    gvfs-fuse-daemon 2.8G 2.7G 2.1M 100% /home/paul/.gvfs
    paul@paul-desktop:~$

    just realised terminal had a menu to close...oops. Easy.

  6. #5
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    How you proceed will depend on how much time you have spent setting up your system, if you have not spent much time on this then a fresh install is the easiest approach.
    It sounds as though you have a limit on boot partition size (probably 1024 cylinders which is about 8GB for the drive). Given this position I would setup partitions as follows (but this is just my suggested partition layout the key thing is for you to have a boot partition on the drive less than 1024 cylinders):

    Primary partition 500MB ext3 boot partition (/boot)
    Extended partition covering the rest of the hard drive with logical partitions
    15GB ext3 root partition (/)
    1GB swap partition (swap) this should be 2xRAM in system upto 1GB.
    63GB ext3 home partition (/home) rest of hard drive

    To do this boot from the live CD and use the partitioner to remove the existing partitions and create new partitions with the required layout. Then start the installer and select custom partition, the installer will detect the swap automatically but you will need to select the partitions and allocate them to /boot, /, /home.

    If you want to retain your existing install then I would be tempted to increase the root partition size to 8GB and create a separate home partition with the remaining free space. If you want to do this then you should post the output of
    Code:
    sudo cat /etc/fstab
    sudo cat /boot/grub/menu.lst
    before you start the resize of partitions. You will need to boot from the live CD to do the partition resize.

    Ed: you can type exit at the terminal to close the terminal

  7. #6
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    Thank you dc and j 183. It is Saturday evening here, and I have to drive my son somewhere.
    I'll revisit this tomorrow. I eventually really could get into this Linux thing. I've got von Hagen's Bible, but need time to absorb and move into this stuff.
    I'll assess which is the lower-risk, full re-install or do what you are saying as the other option.

    It's great to be out from under MS/Win. I use Macs at work in a prepress situation, but there's something mighty appealing about Open Source. Am gobsmacked by 8.04. It's great.The install went beyond expectation.

    I post over here too, if you have time to look in...

    linux recommendations??

    Many thanks for your help so far. I'm a bit older coming to this, [60], but intend to "plug on".

    Shall post back over the coming days.

  8. #7
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    Your never too old ... both approaches will work, you can stick with your current install and get that working the way you want but it will take you a bit more time. The fresh install option is easier but you don't need to fresh install for this problem. You can update partition layout (boot from the live CD for this!) and then adjust /etc/fstab and possibly /boot/grub/menu.lst to suit.
    Good luck & let us know how it goes

  9. #8
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    # /etc/fstab: static file system information.
    #
    # <file system> <mount point> <type> <options> <dump> <pass>
    proc /proc proc defaults 0 0
    # /dev/sdb1
    UUID=ab53e665-e180-4fa0-af9a-61fe2ab0f6ec / ext3 relatime,errors=remount-ro 0 1
    # /dev/sdb2
    UUID=2e9507b4-5def-4732-996c-e746df8315c8 none swap sw 0 0
    /dev/scd0 /media/cdrom0 udf,iso9660 user,noauto,exec,utf8 0 0
    /dev/fd0 /media/floppy0 auto rw,user,noauto,exec,utf8 0 0



    sudo cat /boot/grub/menu.lst
    # menu.lst - See: grub(, info grub, update-grub(
    # grub-install(, grub-floppy(,
    # grub-md5-crypt, /usr/share/doc/grub
    # and /usr/share/doc/grub-doc/.

    Let me know if this is what you wanted...thanks.

  10. #9
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    The fstab information is OK but there should be a lot more of the grub menu.lst file.

    Ed: You can probably use
    Code:
    gedit /boot/grub/menu.lst
    and then copy & paste the information.

  11. #10
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    Thanks jonathon 183. Just learned 1st lesson in Terminal 101. All output is probably required!


    here it is hopefully:


    ~$ sudo cat /boot/grub/menu.lst
    [sudo] password for paul:
    # menu.lst - See: grub(, info grub, update-grub(
    # grub-install(, grub-floppy(,
    # grub-md5-crypt, /usr/share/doc/grub
    # and /usr/share/doc/grub-doc/.

    ## default num
    # Set the default entry to the entry number NUM. Numbering starts from 0, and
    # the entry number 0 is the default if the command is not used.
    #
    # You can specify 'saved' instead of a number. In this case, the default entry
    # is the entry saved with the command 'savedefault'.
    # WARNING: If you are using dmraid do not use 'savedefault' or your
    # array will desync and will not let you boot your system.
    default 0

    ## timeout sec
    # Set a timeout, in SEC seconds, before automatically booting the default entry
    # (normally the first entry defined).
    timeout 10

    ## hiddenmenu
    # Hides the menu by default (press ESC to see the menu)
    #hiddenmenu

    # Pretty colours
    #color cyan/blue white/blue

    ## password ['--md5'] passwd
    # If used in the first section of a menu file, disable all interactive editing
    # control (menu entry editor and command-line) and entries protected by the
    # command 'lock'
    # e.g. password topsecret
    # password --md5 $1$gLhU0/$aW78kHK1QfV3P2b2znUoe/
    # password topsecret

    #
    # examples
    #
    # title Windows 95/98/NT/2000
    # root (hd0,0)
    # makeactive
    # chainloader +1
    #
    # title Linux
    # root (hd0,1)
    # kernel /vmlinuz root=/dev/hda2 ro
    #

    #
    # Put static boot stanzas before and/or after AUTOMAGIC KERNEL LIST

    ### BEGIN AUTOMAGIC KERNELS LIST
    ## lines between the AUTOMAGIC KERNELS LIST markers will be modified
    ## by the debian update-grub script except for the default options below

    ## DO NOT UNCOMMENT THEM, Just edit them to your needs

    ## ## Start Default Options ##
    ## default kernel options
    ## default kernel options for automagic boot options
    ## If you want special options for specific kernels use kopt_x_y_z
    ## where x.y.z is kernel version. Minor versions can be omitted.
    ## e.g. kopt=root=/dev/hda1 ro
    ## kopt_2_6_8=root=/dev/hdc1 ro
    ## kopt_2_6_8_2_686=root=/dev/hdc2 ro
    # kopt=root=UUID=ab53e665-e180-4fa0-af9a-61fe2ab0f6ec ro

    ## Setup crashdump menu entries
    ## e.g. crashdump=1
    # crashdump=0

    ## default grub root device
    ## e.g. groot=(hd0,0)
    # groot=(hd1,0)

    ## should update-grub create alternative automagic boot options
    ## e.g. alternative=true
    ## alternative=false
    # alternative=true

    ## should update-grub lock alternative automagic boot options
    ## e.g. lockalternative=true
    ## lockalternative=false
    # lockalternative=false

    ## additional options to use with the default boot option, but not with the
    ## alternatives
    ## e.g. defoptions=vga=791 resume=/dev/hda5
    # defoptions=quiet splash

    ## should update-grub lock old automagic boot options
    ## e.g. lockold=false
    ## lockold=true
    # lockold=false

    ## Xen hypervisor options to use with the default Xen boot option
    # xenhopt=

    ## Xen Linux kernel options to use with the default Xen boot option
    # xenkopt=console=tty0

    ## altoption boot targets option
    ## multiple altoptions lines are allowed
    ## e.g. altoptions=(extra menu suffix) extra boot options
    ## altoptions=(recovery) single
    # altoptions=(recovery mode) single

    ## controls how many kernels should be put into the menu.lst
    ## only counts the first occurence of a kernel, not the
    ## alternative kernel options
    ## e.g. howmany=all
    ## howmany=7
    # howmany=all

    ## should update-grub create memtest86 boot option
    ## e.g. memtest86=true
    ## memtest86=false
    # memtest86=true

    ## should update-grub adjust the value of the default booted system
    ## can be true or false
    # updatedefaultentry=false

    ## should update-grub add savedefault to the default options
    ## can be true or false
    # savedefault=false

    ## ## End Default Options ##

    title Ubuntu 8.04, kernel 2.6.24-19-generic
    root (hd1,0)
    kernel /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.24-19-generic root=UUID=ab53e665-e180-4fa0-af9a-61fe2ab0f6ec ro quiet splash
    initrd /boot/initrd.img-2.6.24-19-generic
    quiet

    title Ubuntu 8.04, kernel 2.6.24-19-generic (recovery mode)
    root (hd1,0)
    kernel /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.24-19-generic root=UUID=ab53e665-e180-4fa0-af9a-61fe2ab0f6ec ro single
    initrd /boot/initrd.img-2.6.24-19-generic

    title Ubuntu 8.04, kernel 2.6.24-16-generic
    root (hd1,0)
    kernel /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.24-16-generic root=UUID=ab53e665-e180-4fa0-af9a-61fe2ab0f6ec ro quiet splash
    initrd /boot/initrd.img-2.6.24-16-generic
    quiet

    title Ubuntu 8.04, kernel 2.6.24-16-generic (recovery mode)
    root (hd1,0)
    kernel /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.24-16-generic root=UUID=ab53e665-e180-4fa0-af9a-61fe2ab0f6ec ro single
    initrd /boot/initrd.img-2.6.24-16-generic

    title Ubuntu 8.04, memtest86+
    root (hd1,0)
    kernel /boot/memtest86+.bin
    quiet

    ### END DEBIAN AUTOMAGIC KERNELS LIST

    # This is a divider, added to separate the menu items below from the Debian
    # ones.
    title Other operating systems:
    root


    # This entry automatically added by the Debian installer for a non-linux OS
    # on /dev/sda1
    title Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition
    root (hd0,0)
    savedefault
    makeactive
    chainloader +1


    Sent from Firefox, in Ubuntu, of course..

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