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I am worried I will erase my C:drive which I do not want to do. From the info from the Bios (or whatever it is that comes on with the ...
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  1. #1
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    How to make sure I partition the right drive


    I am worried I will erase my C:drive which I do not want to do.

    From the info from the Bios (or whatever it is that comes on with the Del key before the Op syst gets in), I have 4 hard drives as follows;
    -250GB Primary IDE Master (This is where my C:drive is)
    -320GB Third Master (EMPTY - this is where I want Ubuntu to be)
    -320GB Third IDE slave
    -1000GB - Fourth IDE master.

    QUESTION: using the alternate ubuntu 8.04.1 (the only cd I could get to work), how can I install Ubuntu on the 320GB drive called 'third Master', for DUAL BOOT with Vista?
    Repeat: I am terrified of erasing my C:drive...

    Gilles

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    Unplug all other drives from the system, do the install. After the install reboot and check system works then shutdown the system, connect all the other drives. Set Linux drive as first drive to boot from in the system (BIOS, cable select or hard drive links), boot the system into Linux, open a terminal and type
    Code:
    sudo fdisk -l
    the l is a small L.
    Post the output here. Someone can then post entry to add to /boot/grub/menu.lst file to allow Windows boot.

  3. #3
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    You could use your Ubuntu cd, let it load into memory before the install and enter command 'fdisk -l' (without quotes, Lower case Letter L) and you will get an output which tells you how Ubuntu sees your drives. It will list your drives, partitions and filesystem types so if you see one that has 'ntfs' you know that is the windows one and take care not to install there.

    In order to boot both Ubuntu and vista you will need to either install Grub to the master boot record of the first drive or use the vista bootloader to load Linux. If you install Grub to the mbr of the first drive it will write over your vista mbr. Generally, this works with no problems. If you don't want to do this, you can boot Ubuntu from vista and the easiest way to do this is to download and use EasyBCD (free download) to edit BCEdit in vista:
    http://neosmart.net/dl.php?id=1

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    I tried Jonathan's suggestion first, and it didn't work.
    I did keep only one disk connected, and went through the installation (alternate) up to the point where it search for a Hard Disk. It didn't find any.

    I noticed something that might mean something. The Bios recognizes this disc as an IDE disc, but in fact it is an ATA disk with the narrow red (might are red) connectors. Could that be a problem?

    Gilles

  5. #5
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    I tried Jonathan's suggestion first, and it didn't work.
    What didn't work? Whats the error message?
    If fdisk doesn't recognize Harddisk, Linux installer will not detect it too. Make sure that Harddisk must be Enabled in BIOS.
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

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    It did not find the disk, however, when I reconnected just the C:drive disk, not changing the connection of the drive that was not recognized, that drive was recognized by Windows. (It is formatted as NTFS, but I was ready to use it only for Ubuntu, it is empty).
    If VIsta sees it, Bios must see it too.

    I'm barely breathing here... I'm getting beyond my depth. Perhaps Ubuntu is too complex for me. They said it was easy...

    Gilles

  7. #7
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    I would again suggest you load your Ubuntu CD, not try to install anything, but open the terminal/konsole on the desktop (usually an icon that looks like a monitor) and run the command 'fdisk -l', or 'sudo fdisk -l' and post the results. Which drives do you have plugged in? Any operating systems on them? If so, which? Were there previously any OS's on them?

    Where did you get the Ubuntu CD? You could have a bad download. Did you do the md5 check after download, burn it as an iso image, slow speed?

  8. #8
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    If you are able to boot from a live CD then post the output of
    Code:
    sudo fdisk -l
    as indicated by yancek. If you are unable to boot a live CD then try some of the boot parameters for the alternate CD ... I think you press F1 or F2 for help at the initial startup select screen ... look for something for disk or disk controller support. It's also worth running the check media integrity option to make sure the CD is good.

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    Red face

    I'll have to review the whole thing so that you all have the same information.

    1. I DO NOT have a standard Ubuntu CD. I got one from Canonical, I also downloaded it several times, from different places, made countless copies at various speeds down to 1x: Each of those Cds including the one from Canonical, they load the kernel, then give me a series of errors following the prompt (Initramfs). When you ask me to load the CD it is impossible for me.

    2. The only thing I got to work up to a point is a download of Alternate Ubuntu 8.04.1 (64). My machine is AMD Athlon 64, running VISTA.

    When I run Alternate, it goes well up to a point, going through Language, Country, find CD-ROM, find network, name it, set time, THEN DETECT DISK: Result: no disk drive was detected.

    When I ran Alternate, as suggested here, I disconnect my VISTA drive, and leave only the other empty disk connected.

    3. I just ran that again just to make sure. I had two empty drive this time connected (having disconnected the drive on which Vista is on). The same thing happened.

    4. At no point do I seem to have access to a terminal, but I am not sure where to look for it.

    I have been trying this since Ubuntu 8.04 came out several weeks ago.

    My main wish is to be able to use the standard Ubuntu CD so that I do not need to use the Alternate. I even asked on this forum for someone to send me a CD that they know works (I am willing to pay reasonably for it). No one responded. Some say that Canonical CDs also have errors???

    Hoping that this is clear... sorry to be so verbiose, but suggesting to use standard Ubuntu CD is useless to me right now.

    Gilles

  10. #10
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    I basically do not boot any CD, if you are nervous like me, here you go:

    1. Where ever you are, press CTRL + ALT + F2. This drops you to a shell.
    2. You may or may not need to enter root password.
    3. Mount the partitions one by one:

    Code:
    mount -t /dev/blahblah /mnt/blahblah
    4. List the files there:

    Code:
    ls -al /mnt/blahblah
    5. The partitions are listed with the files they contain. This is a very reliable test.

    6. Unmount the drive and mount the other, repeat until you find the right drive.

    Happy formatting!

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