Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 5 of 5
I am an old timer looking for some help with these new gadgets. have an older puter local build in 2001, 1100MHZ, no internal hd, bought new seagate 640gb, downloaded ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Posts
    2

    how to use a external usb boot disk


    I am an old timer looking for some help with these new gadgets.
    have an older puter local build in 2001, 1100MHZ, no internal hd, bought new
    seagate 640gb, downloaded at brotherinlaws Ubuntu.
    How do I get the old puter to boot on the usb port, I pulled
    the old ribbon cable off the mother board, leaving the FDDI open,
    monitor says that the new dvd i installed is the master drive.
    have 512mb ram. (could be problem).

    thanks much!
    tom

  2. #2
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    4,593
    If your PC can boot from a USB device, you would need to enable it in the BIOS. Most older computers don't have this option, as booting from a USB device is a relatively new option.

    If what you have downloaded is the CD image, a .iso file, Then you could burn that to a CD. You would still need a working operating system to do that.
    Please do not send Private Messages to me with requests for help. I will not reply.

  3. #3
    Linux Guru D-cat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Bounce between Dover, NH - Shapleigh, ME
    Posts
    1,638
    512 MB is plenty of RAM

    You're best to boot off the CD-ROM (DVD Drive), which is the primary drive until the new hard drive is partitioned and an OS installed. Your BIOS will regulate the computer's boot order. Physical cabling of the devices is generally beyond the scope of this thread, but a typically advised setup in a computer of 2001 era (IDE, now referred to as PATA) would be to have separate cables for the hard drive and the DVD drive, with the hard drive on the primary and the DVD on the secondary. BIOS will refer to both drives as "Master", though the HDD would be primary master and the DVD Drive secondary master. If you only have one cable, then usually the DVD Drive would be jumpered as a slave to aviod conflicts.

    All that said, you should be able to put a burned Ubuntu CD (which I assume could be (or has been) done at your brother in law's?) in the dvd drive and boot the computer off the CD.

    Booting off USB is sort of hit-or-miss. Even if your computer is capable of booting from a USB, it may be limited to booting off a key or external hard disk. USB bootable does not necessarily mean it'll boot from an external CD/DVD drive. Not to mention, that your computer likely runs USB 1.1 spec, which is pretty slow to run an OS through.

  4. #4
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Posts
    2

    old puter

    thanks for the feedback so soon! I tried connecting the hd again but was unable to gain access to the bios. I returned the new usb ext hd for a new sata internal and just tried to connect it to find out that SATA actually means the type of connector is different. Of course, It never was installed because of my mother board which does not have these newer connectors, It uses ribbon cable. Now, I am thinking of waiting a few more weeks to save some more money to buy a new puter with these things I need. But, I DO NOT like VISTA. So, a new dilema.

    Thanks for your help! Tom

  5. #5
    Linux Guru D-cat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Bounce between Dover, NH - Shapleigh, ME
    Posts
    1,638
    That's why I made reference to IDE or PATA... IDE (Integrated Drive Electronics) has been around since the mid 90's, and has been the de facto standard since. IDE uses the ATAPI interface spec. With the rather recent (2003) SATA development, there was perceived a need to differentiate the connections by type... Past IDE used a Parallel interface, where individual bits were sent down different wires to get the data in place faster (hence, the ribbon cables). Technically, though, the new SATA drives are also IDE, but they transmit their data in serial instead of parallel in order to avoid the propagation delays that have started rearing their ugly head as the speed increased; we have reached a physical speed limit with parallel data technology, a sort of terminal velocity. SATA drives only use one pair of wires to send data in each direction, each bit one after another, thus a much smaller cable and obviously incompatible connection. Anyway, the old IDE style is now referred to a PATA (Parallel Atapi) and the new SATA drives are just that (Serial Atapi). In your current computer, the internal drive needs to be labeled (E)IDE or PATA, effectively the same thing.

    I don't know if you can exchange your current drive for the right one where you got it, but I'd look into it. Maybe you'll get lucky and someone will be willing to trade you.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •