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Hey there, everybody at LinuxForums! I'm new to the boards here as well as Linux. I've been a Windows user all my life until about a month ago I made ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined! KPolulak's Avatar
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    Post Trouble with Application Installation


    Hey there, everybody at LinuxForums!

    I'm new to the boards here as well as Linux. I've been a Windows user all my life until about a month ago I made "The Big Switch". I still use Windows regularly but I've come to find that using Linux is actually quite fun!

    While I am still a noob when it comes to Linux, I do have experience with computer upgrades and repair/networking/programming etc. So don't think of me as a complete moron. Anyway, enough babbling...

    I am currently running Ubuntu 8.04 on a Dell Latitude D600. It's the only OS installed on it. It does NOT have a working Internet connection (I work on that after this problem is resolved). I haven't really installed any third-party software just yet because 1) I've been focusing most of my time on learning to use the terminal and 2) I'm having the serious problems with the installation process.

    For instance, here is how I've been trying to install File Roller 2.24.3:

    1. Open up the terminal
    2. Navigate to the directory where I keep all my ".tar" files ("cd ~/Tarballs")
    3. Run "tar xvzf file-roller-2.24.3.tar.gz"
    4. Navigate to the newly created directory ("cd ~/Tarballs/file-roller-2.24.3")
    5. Run "./configure"
    6. This is the message I get:

    checking for a BSD-compatible install... /usr/bin/install -c
    checking whether build environment is sane... yes
    checking for a thread-safe mkdir -p... /bin/mkdir -p
    checking for gawk... no
    checking for mawk... mawk
    checking whether make sets $(MAKE)... yes
    checking for gcc... gcc
    checking for C compiler default output file name...
    configure: error: C compiler cannot create executables
    See 'config.log' for more details.

    Ok, so I do an online search for "C compilers for Linux" and find out about GCC. I download the "tar.bz2" file, transfer it to my Linux box, and...

    1. Open up the terminal
    2. Navigate to "~/Tarballs"
    3. Run "tar xvjf gcc-4.2.4.tar.bz2"
    4. Navigate to the newly created directory ("cd ~/Tarballs/gcc-4.2.4")
    5. Run "./configure"
    6. Now I get this message:

    creating cache ./config.cache
    checking host system type... i686-pc-linux-gnulibc1
    checking target system type... i686-pc-linux-gnulibc1
    checking build system type... i686-pc-linux-gnulibc1
    checking for a BSD compatible install... /usr/bin/install -c
    checking whether ln works... yes
    checking whether ln -s works... yes
    checking for gcc... gcc
    checking whether the C compiler (gcc ) works... no
    configure: error: installation or configuration problem: C compiler cannot create executables.

    I've tried reading GCC's "man" page but couldn't find much help.

    So, to install File Roller I need a C compiler but when I go to install the compiler (GCC), that needs a C compiler as well? What the hell? I've tried looking for pre-compiled versions of GCC, thinking maybe that would help, but had no such luck finding one.

    Any help that you guys could provide would be much appreciated.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    Hi and Welcome !

    C and other compilers are not installed by default. You have to install those first. Package is available in Ubuntu CD.
    Open Terminal and execute this
    Code:
    sudo apt-cdrom add
    sudo apt-get update
    sudo apt-get install build-essential
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  3. #3
    Just Joined! KPolulak's Avatar
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    Ok, devils casper, I ran "sudo apt-cdrom add" and everything went fine. After that, I tried "sudo apt-get update" but that was unsuccessful because the machine running Ubuntu is not connected to the Internet. So then I ran "sudo apt-get install build-essential" and that went fine as well.

    But, of course, I'm still having trouble. Now when I run "./configure" I get this message:

    checking for a BSD-compatible install... /usr/bin/install -c
    checking whether build environment is sane... yes
    checking for a thread-safe mkdir -p... /bin/mkdir -p
    checking for gawk... no
    checking for mawk... mawk
    checking whether make sets $(MAKE)... yes
    checking for gcc... gcc
    checking for C compiler default output file name... a.out
    checking whether the C compiler works... yes
    checking whether we are cross compiling... no
    checking for suffix of executables...
    checking for suffix of object files... o
    checking whether we are using the GNU C compiler... yes
    checking whether gcc accepts -g... yes
    checking for gcc option to accept ISO C89... none needed
    checking for style of include used by make... GNU
    checking dependency style of gcc... gcc3
    checking build system type... i686-pc-linux-gnu
    checking host system type... i686-pc-linux-gnu
    checking for a sed that does not truncate output... /bin/sed
    checking for grep that handles long lines and -e... /bin/grep
    checking for egrep... /bin/grep -E
    checking for ld used by gcc... /usr/bin/ld
    checking if the linker (/usr/bin/ld) is GNU ld... yes
    checking for /usr/bin/ld option to reload object files... -r
    checking for BSD-compatible nm... /usr/bin/nm -B
    checking whether ln -s works... yes
    checking how to recognize dependent libraries... pass_all
    checking how to run the C preprocessor... gcc -E
    checking for ANSI C header files... yes
    checking for sys/types.h... yes
    checking for sys/stat.h... yes
    checking for stdlib.h... yes
    checking for string.h... yes
    checking for memory.h... yes
    checking for strings.h... yes
    checking for inttypes.h... yes
    checking for stdint.h... yes
    checking for unistd.h... yes
    checking dlfcn.h usability... yes
    checking dlfcn.h presence... yes
    checking for dlfcn.h... yes
    checking for g++... g++
    checking whether we are using the GNU C++ compiler... yes
    checking whether g++ accepts -g... yes
    checking dependency style of g++... gcc3
    checking how to run the C++ preprocessor... g++ -E
    checking for g77... no
    checking for xlf... no
    checking for f77... no
    checking for frt... no
    checking for pgf77... no
    checking for cf77... no
    checking for fort77... no
    checking for fl32... no
    checking for af77... no
    checking for xlf90... no
    checking for f90... no
    checking for pgf90... no
    checking for pghpf... no
    checking for epcf90... no
    checking for gfortran... no
    checking for g95... no
    checking for xlf95... no
    checking for f95... no
    checking for fort... no
    checking for ifort... no
    checking for ifc... no
    checking for efc... no
    checking for pgf95... no
    checking for lf95... no
    checking for ftn... no
    checking whether we are using the GNU Fortran 77 compiler... no
    checking whether accepts -g... no
    checking the maximum length of command line arguments... 98304
    checking command to parse /usr/bin/nm -B output from gcc object... ok
    checking for objdir... .libs
    checking for ar... ar
    checking for ranlib... ranlib
    checking for strip... strip
    checking if gcc supports -fno-rtti -fno-exceptions... no
    checking for gcc option to produce PIC... -fPIC
    checking if gcc PIC flag -fPIC works... yes
    checking if gcc static flag -static works... yes
    checking if gcc supports -c -o file.o... yes
    checking whether the gcc linker (/usr/bin/ld) supports shared libraries... yes
    checking whether -lc should be explicitly linked in... no
    checking dynamic linker characteristics... GNU/Linux ld.so
    checking how to hardcode library paths into programs... immediate
    checking whether stripping libraries is possible... yes
    checking if libtool supports shared libraries... yes
    checking whether to build shared libraries... yes
    checking whether to build static libraries... yes
    configure: creating libtool
    appending configuration tag "CXX" to libtool
    checking for ld used by g++... /usr/bin/ld
    checking if the linker (/usr/bin/ld) is GNU ld... yes
    checking whether the g++ linker (/usr/bin/ld) supports shared libraries... yes
    checking for g++ option to produce PIC... -fPIC
    checking if g++ PIC flag -fPIC works... yes
    checking if g++ static flag -static works... yes
    checking if g++ supports -c -o file.o... yes
    checking whether the g++ linker (/usr/bin/ld) supports shared libraries... yes
    checking dynamic linker characteristics... GNU/Linux ld.so
    (cached) (cached) checking how to hardcode library paths into programs... immediate
    appending configuration tag "F77" to libtool
    checking for glib-genmarshal... no
    checking for glib-mkenums... no
    checking for pkg-config... /usr/bin/pkg-config
    checking pkg-config is at least version 0.9.0... yes
    checking for FR... configure: error: Package requirements (glib-2.0 >= 2.16.0 gthread-2.0 gio-unix-2.0 >= 2.16.0 gtk+-2.0 >= 2.12.0 gconf-2.0 >= 2.6.0 libgnome-2.0 >= 2.6.0 libgnomeui-2.0 >= 2.6.0 libglade-2.0 >= 2.4.0) were not met:

    No package 'glib-2.0' found
    No package 'gthread-2.0' found
    No package 'gio-unix-2.0' found
    No package 'gtk+-2.0' found
    No package 'gconf-2.0' found
    No package 'libgnome-2.0' found
    No package 'libgnomeui-2.0' found
    No package 'libglade-2.0' found

    Consider adjusting the PKG_CONFIG_PATH environment variable if you
    installed software in a non-standard prefix.

    Alternatively, you may set the environment variables FR_CFLAGS
    and FR_LIBS to avoid the need to call pkg-config.
    See the pkg-config man page for more details.


    I get the feeling that I'm going to need to connect to the Internet to resolve this. If that's the case, then I'm going to have to go through the trouble of finding either Linux drivers for my Ethernet controller or for my wireless network controller. I got a feeling that Dell ain't gonna have that.

    Boy, oh boy... ...help?

  4. #4
    Linux Guru D-cat's Avatar
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    sudo apt-get gnome-core

    BTW: this is why installing from repositories or .deb packages is easier and recommended.

  5. #5
    Linux Enthusiast Bemk's Avatar
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    If you want to compile, that's okay, but please wait with doing that until you are a bit more experienced. I like to compile my packages my self. I think there's nothing as much fun as compiling for hours and finding out you did something wrong in the beginning. My advice, use a graphical package management tool, such as synaptic.

    I say, get that network connection up and running and then use your package manager.

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