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Originally Posted by D-cat I believe you should still do the /sbin/fsck.ext3 -ckfvy /dev/sda1 while in read-only (or booted from live CD - DO NOT RUN THAT COMMAND IN USER ...
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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by D-cat View Post
    I believe you should still do the

    /sbin/fsck.ext3 -ckfvy /dev/sda1

    while in read-only (or booted from live CD - DO NOT RUN THAT COMMAND IN USER MODE!) prior to continuing to use this drive.
    this is probably a stupid question but how do i know if i'm in user mode? i want to try this command but i don't want to mess something up

  2. #12
    Linux Guru D-cat's Avatar
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    First, if you have a graphical interface up, you're in user mode. If you're logged in as a user ("$" or ">" prompt), you're in user mode.

    What I mostly meant by that (which was incorrect, I was simplifying) was if the boot process completed. This would mean the root partition was remounted read-write, and all sorts of havock could be wreaked by the fsck. What you need is to make sure your root partition is mounted read-only (or not at all if from another boot source). As it sits, we have that confirmation...
    The root file system is currently mounted in read only mode. A maintenance shell will now be started.
    You should have a prompt that ends in a "#", this means you are in single user, or root user, mode. This is where you want to be (gives you permission to access the device directly). You may proceed. Then you can go make dinner, this will not be done for a while (few minutes to a few hours, depending on a number of factors... possibly over a day if damage is extensive on a really large hard drive).

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    Quote Originally Posted by D-cat View Post
    /sbin/fsck.ext3 -ckfvy /dev/sda1
    I ran that command as you said. It found some bad stuff and fixed them i think. then it ran again until it got back to an open command prompt. i just entered exit and so it restarted without any hangups. i then just shut it down completely and that's where its at now.
    i noticed when it restarted that it did not say it was doing any of the drive check stuff it normally shows when kubuntu is loading. do i have to do something else now to get it to check its own drives upon start up like it up like it used to do?

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    fsck is invoked with a quick check at every boot anyway, just to check if the shutdown was clean. Only if it wasn't (or a certain number of days determined at format has gone by) does it invoke a preened check of the filesystem, automatically fixing small common problems related to a system crash. If it finds something more serious, it ends the way it did to you above, with a message that a more serious problem was found and you need to manually fix it.

    Do you remember what the "bad stuff" was that it found? It may make the difference as to whether the drive is now safe to use or if it should be replaced sooner than later. I'd sugest you don't save anything on there you can't afford to lose until you are sure the drive is stable.

    edit: To answer your request

    If you wish to force the drive to check itself at mount every day, use the following:

    sudo tune2fs -i 1d /dev/sda1

    or, to force it at every boot

    sudo tune2fs -c 1 /dev/sda1

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    thanks for the help. i think i should take a beginning linux class at the local cc this summer.

  7. #16
    Linux Guru D-cat's Avatar
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    This is not a bad idea. You can also check on a local Linux users group. Here's a starting point:
    Linux Online - User Groups

    Check out what they offer before choosing one. Some are more focused on technical aspects while others are more about general user education and workshops. Good luck!

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