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Also, in Ubuntu, when opening the Computer folder, I see a /home folder and then a /Windows folder (which is what I called my windows partition). However, all my documents ...
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  1. #11
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    Also, in Ubuntu, when opening the Computer folder, I see a /home folder and then a /Windows folder (which is what I called my windows partition). However, all my documents that were originally in Windows are in my windows folder and NOT in my /home folder.
    Right. That's the way it should be. The /home folder contains the user directory(s) for Ubuntu. Your windows files should be uner '/windows'.

    Again, my goal is to be able to, say, edit a document in Linux, save it and when I boot up Vista, I have that edited file.
    You can do that. You need ntfs-3g installed and that may be done with Ubuntu install without additional configuration. Don't use Ubuntu so I'm not sure. It's definitely available.

    Also, when I download a picture off the Internet in Vista and save it, I will have that saved picture also in Linux.
    Not sure what you mean here? If you download something in Vista and save it, you will be able to view/access it through Ubuntu.

    left the remaining 126 GB as a shared partition between Linux and Vista (I called it /home; should I not have done this?)
    No, you should not have done this because Linux systems install a /home partition for users files. Just call it something else, 'shared', 'stuff', whatever.

    When I boot up Vista, I simply see a C:// drive that only has 50 GB on it. There are no other drives (other than the CD/DVD drive). I assume I have to do something with mounting? How do I get my documents, pics and music into the 126 GB shared space and make it accessible to both Linux and Vista? I cannot see this space.
    Never used vista but, my understanding is that it doesn't see and obviously can't write to a Linux partition without some third party software being installed. Also, windows does not usually recognize Linux partitions which is why you only see 50
    GB in vista.

    I agree with dale456654. Create new partition and format ntfs. Mounting basically gives an access point to see the system or files. Google 'linux mount', you should get lots of detailed explanations better than anything I could give.

  2. #12
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    I am trying to partition the remaining GB of free space on my hard drive into a shared partition. However, I cannot format it as ntfs. The closest thing I can format it to is FAT32 which makes me use /dos as a mount point (because I use /windows as the mount point for my Windows partition).

    Should I just format it as FAT32 and then reformat it to ntfs using GParted? Will GParted format the partition into ntfs? Also, does that mean I can just name any mount point?

  3. #13
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    Try not to give the shared partition any mount point. If you give it a mount point it will always be in use by the operating system and you will not be able to change it.

    What i suggest you do is the Ubuntu partition should be mounted as / then give your other drive labels. Then when you boot into Ubuntu you can just click any drive and it will be available.

    Linux can read both Fat32 and NTFS Drives but it will be slower.

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    So, I have my Linux partition as ext3 and mounted with "/". Should I have my Windows partition mounted as "/windows"? Or just not mount it?

    Regarding the shared drive, I should not put a mount point on it and just format it as FAT32?

    Will that drive be visible to both Ubuntu and Vista?

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    Can anybody help me on this matter?

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    When trying to format my shared partition into a FAT32 file system without a mount point, I get a notification from the Ubuntu installer that says if I have a FAT32 partition without a mount point, that partition "will not be used at all." Should I continue or change something? I cannot format it into ntfs because that is not one of the choices in the drop down menu.

  8. #17
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rarehunter View Post
    So, I have my Linux partition as ext3 and mounted with "/". Should I have my Windows partition mounted as "/windows"? Or just not mount it?

    Regarding the shared drive, I should not put a mount point on it and just format it as FAT32?

    Will that drive be visible to both Ubuntu and Vista?
    Quote Originally Posted by Rarehunter View Post
    Can anybody help me on this matter?
    FAT32 and NTFS partitions can be read and written to by both Windows and Linux, the only thing is you should use the ntfs-3g driver in Linux if you want to write to an NTFS partition.

    You should have:-
    Windows partition (usually NTFS but sometimes FAT32)
    Linux root partition (usually Ext3 but other Linux formats are possible - it can not be NTFS or FAT32)

    You may also have:-
    Linux swap partition (format Linux swap - this is virtual memory)
    Linux /home partition (usually Ext3 but other Linux formats are possible - it should not be NTFS or FAT32)
    Data partition to store docs, photos etc (may be NTFS or FAT32)

    I recommend you use a live CD like PartedMagic to resize partitions to make space for data partitions etc if you decide to create one.

    You can store the data on your Windows partition if you want and both Windows and Linux will be able to access it ... the problem is if you reinstall Windows your data will be lost.

    Before changing partitions backup your critical data

    Keep in mind you can only have 4 primary partitions on a drive, one of which can be an extended partition (which can contain several logical partitions).

    It may be useful for you to post the output of
    Code:
    sudo fdisk -l
    so we can see the disk patition structure.

  9. #18
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rarehunter View Post
    When trying to format my shared partition into a FAT32 file system without a mount point, I get a notification from the Ubuntu installer that says if I have a FAT32 partition without a mount point, that partition "will not be used at all." Should I continue or change something? I cannot format it into ntfs because that is not one of the choices in the drop down menu.
    If you are going to reinstall, booting from the live CD then you can use the partitioner tool to create/resize/delete partitions. It's best if you post fdisk -l ouput for us to see the partition structure ... we can give specific advice refering to partitions you have.

  10. #19
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    Well, my goal is to have a Windows partition, a Linux partition, and a shared data partition that can be read and written to by both Windows and Linux.

    I am reinstalling Ubuntu 9.04.

    I have resized my Windows partition (ntfs). Should I mount it as /windows or not mount it at all?

    I have created a Linux partition (ext3), mounted it as "/".

    I have also created a swap partition (ext3).

    Now, my question is, for the remaining space, if I wanted to use it as a shared data partition, should I mount it as something or not mount it at all? If I should mount it, what should I mount it as? Also, can the format be FAT32 (because I cannot format it as ntfs in the Ubuntu installer) and use GParted to reformat it to ntfs later?

    Then, I can install ntfs-3g in Ubuntu.

    Would that allow Vista and Ubuntu to both read/write into the shared data partition?

  11. #20
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rarehunter View Post
    Well, my goal is to have a Windows partition, a Linux partition, and a shared data partition that can be read and written to by both Windows and Linux.

    I am reinstalling Ubuntu 9.04.

    I have resized my Windows partition (ntfs). Should I mount it as /windows or not mount it at all?

    I have created a Linux partition (ext3), mounted it as "/".

    I have also created a swap partition (ext3).

    Now, my question is, for the remaining space, if I wanted to use it as a shared data partition, should I mount it as something or not mount it at all? If I should mount it, what should I mount it as? Also, can the format be FAT32 (because I cannot format it as ntfs in the Ubuntu installer) and use GParted to reformat it to ntfs later?

    Then, I can install ntfs-3g in Ubuntu.

    Would that allow Vista and Ubuntu to both read/write into the shared data partition?
    Windows partition is fine - select mount to /windows so it is available after the install (the installer will put entries in fstab for you instead of you having to sort things after the install).

    Linux root OK

    Swap needs to be swap not ext3 formatted.

    Data partition can be FAT32 or NTFS ... use FAT32 if you want. I suggest you mount it to /data or something similar.

    Don't worry about ntfs-3g that should be installed by Ubuntu anyway.

    There is no need to change the data partition format unless you run into problems with FAT32 for example using 4GB files. Vista and Ubuntu will be able to read and write data to and from it.

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