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Hey everyone. The other day one of my hard drives on my windows system decided to stop working. Not entirely sure what happened, but it seemed that it just erased ...
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  1. #1
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    Data Recovery from Windows NTFS drive on Ubuntu


    Hey everyone.

    The other day one of my hard drives on my windows system decided to stop working. Not entirely sure what happened, but it seemed that it just erased its partition header, although I wasn't able to recover it.

    Anyway, I successfully got an image of the drive using GNU_ddrescue (yay!), and I'm currently salvaging what CAN be salvaged with foremost.

    So, can anyone suggest a way to get EVERYTHING off of the drive? I mean, it seems that it's all intact (since foremost is finding so much stuff).

    I've tried mounting the partition, but it's not working. (I'd post the output from the terminal, but the forum thinks there is/are URL(s) in it....)

    Any suggestions?

  2. #2
    oz
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    Hello and welcome!

    TestDisk and PhotoRec are good data recovery tools:

    TestDisk - CGSecurity

    You can find them both on the Parted Magic LiveCD:

    Parted Magic News

    They usually work really well, but of course there are no guarantees that any application can get it all back.

    Best of luck to you with your recovery efforts.
    oz

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    The drive is completely dead now, so I can't use testdisk.
    I've already used foremost on the image, so I've recovered the files that photorec would find, and then some.

    I'm looking for a way to get a mirror of the filesystem off of the image, since forescore doesn't recovery everything, and the files don't have their original names.

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    Just Joined! JimBoCol's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crazydog View Post
    The drive is completely dead now, so I can't use testdisk.
    I've already used foremost on the image, so I've recovered the files that photorec would find, and then some.

    I'm looking for a way to get a mirror of the filesystem off of the image, since forescore doesn't recovery everything, and the files don't have their original names.
    This is why I'm so very amazed that there is no good working backup utility for Linux. One would think that something like that would be one of the first things developed and refined.

    Jim.

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    Linux Enthusiast Mudgen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimBoCol View Post
    This is why I'm so very amazed that there is no good working backup utility for Linux. One would think that something like that would be one of the first things developed and refined.

    Jim.
    ??? Certainly there are good working backup utilities for Linux, but the OP's problem description is of trying to rescue a Windows NTFS disk using Linux tools.

    Crazydog, if you actually got an intact image off the disk before it failed, you should be able to restore that to a same or larger sized disk and get native access to the NTFS filesystem. In fact, if the image is intact and the disk was a Windows boot drive, the restored drive should be bootable.
    Last edited by Mudgen; 05-06-2010 at 12:38 AM. Reason: fix nfts typo

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    I suggest you get another harddrive of the same size or larger and restore the image to that drive. Then use Stellar Phoenix for Windows data recovery tool. I have use the Linux tools mention but I noticed Stellar Phoenix find much more.

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    Just Joined! JimBoCol's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by greyhairweenie View Post
    ??? Certainly there are good working backup utilities for Linux,
    I have three of them. and none of them work. I am unable to back up to my server. My only option is CD, floppy, (this system does not even have a floppy drive), or the local hard drive, (which defeats the purpose of backing up).

    I have no intention of backing up 1.5TB to floppy or CDs. Not only would it take forever, It would put me in the poor house.

    Jim.

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    Linux Enthusiast Mudgen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimBoCol View Post
    I have three of them. and none of them work. I am unable to back up to my server. My only option is CD, floppy, (this system does not even have a floppy drive), or the local hard drive, (which defeats the purpose of backing up).

    I have no intention of backing up 1.5TB to floppy or CDs. Not only would it take forever, It would put me in the poor house.

    Jim.
    Open a thread on what you want to accomplish, what you've tried, and what happened. What you want to accomplish is the most important; you may not want to rehash where you've been. Up to you. Give some specifics about the software/configuration on the backup client machine and the server you want to back up to. I'm sure we can help you.

    In general, the rsync utility is very good for backup-to-server scenarios, and there are several gui-based wrappers for it with good content/retention management capabilities. For a bare metal recovery scenario, I also like to have periodic disk images of the backed-up machines.

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    Just Joined! JimBoCol's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by greyhairweenie View Post
    Open a thread on what you want to accomplish, what you've tried, and what happened.
    Already did that, got nowhere, so I gave up.

    Jim.

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    Try this, browsers

    I realize that this comes much too late to be likely to aid the OP in anything, but for those of you passing by, try using a mount -o loop (look up the exact syntax) to mount image file as a partition. You may well get full read access to the partition in it if there was only one and it wasn't too badly scrambled. You might have to specify the filesystem.

    In a situation like this where you are imaging a dying disk to a file, it is preferable to image partitions, not drives, to make it as easy as possible to mount the files as images. This does require a bit more coordination to restore to a drive, however, as you need to match the partition start locations exactly in the partition table for things to work perfectly.

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