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i don't know what you were asked to alter, because you didn't say, most likely it was a text file located somewhere in /etc, which is fundamentally different from the ...
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  1. #11
    Linux Guru coopstah13's Avatar
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    i don't know what you were asked to alter, because you didn't say, most likely it was a text file located somewhere in /etc, which is fundamentally different from the windows registry

    if hardware drivers doesn't detect your card, simply search for nvidia in synaptic package manager and install the right driver for your card

  2. #12
    Just Joined! tyho's Avatar
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    I just realized there is a howto on Synaptic on linuxforums.org

  3. #13
    Just Joined! luckyshot's Avatar
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    Within my posts here is navigations to NVIDIA.com

    Quote Originally Posted by coopstah13 View Post
    i don't know what you were asked to alter, because you didn't say, most likely it was a text file located somewhere in /etc, which is fundamentally different from the windows registry

    if hardware drivers doesn't detect your card, simply search for nvidia in synaptic package manager and install the right driver for your card
    Hi again!
    Thanks again Coopstah13, it's always nice to have your input. In answer to this I've included some navigation instructions, but here...NVIDA.com > Driver Downloads > Beta & Driver Archives > USE THESE SETTINGS....Product Type: GeForce...Product series: GeForce 6....Product: GeForce 6150SE/nForce 430.....Operating System: Linux 64 bit.....You'll then get a list of applicable driver downloads, the one that is current for my system is 260.19.12 > Linux Drivers Installation Instructions for this driver is on the DETAILS PAGE.
    If you don't know how to configure for X, this will show you. If you don't do the configuration then your system will never boot into your desktop, but stay at a COMMAND LINE mode of some kind, which is where I'm at with it. There is a lot to it, it's not a simple process, it involves changing the DIRECTORY and some stuff I'm totally unfamiliar with.....Hence this is why I ask people here to point some guidance my way by virtue of published works (preferably free).
    Using "Sys>Admin>Hrdwr Drivers" only gets you in the door with the install. After re-booting the computer you will end up in a COMMAND LINE mode, not the desktop. Nothing you do will get you up to a Desktop Configuration until you complete the process at this COMMAND LINE. Something I've not been able to accomplish.
    The instructions have me altering kernels, recompiling, and basically as I read through it I can pick out all the words and know it's at least in English...but what the instructions say and mean is beyond me. It tells me to do something, but gives no navigation to where I'm supposed to do it, or how I'm supposed to do it. A lot of assumptions are made by the architect of the instructions, and much needed details left out because they assume a level of familiarity with Linux that I don't possess.
    Last edited by luckyshot; 10-14-2010 at 05:37 AM. Reason: adding more information

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  5. #14
    Linux Guru coopstah13's Avatar
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    its been a while since i've installed the driver that way, but there are really only a couple steps to get it to work, that being said, use the advice from my previous post

  6. #15
    Just Joined! luckyshot's Avatar
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    COMMAND LINE mode?

    Sorry Coop,
    I don't see how using the Synaptic Package manager is going to do all the re-configuring required after the re-boot? It's working at the COMMAND LINE that throws me off, and that would be the next step. I need a learning curve boost before messing with the COMMAND LINE. Advise me by recommending a well written guide that includes the COMMAND LINE within it's scope of instruction.
    Just because I may refer to it as COMMAND LINE, doesn't mean that it's the right name for it. It acts like a terminal, but it's initiated after installing (NVIDIA DISPLAY DRIVER 260.19.12) and re-booting the system. Instead of the desktop coming up, a prompt with a flashing cursor comes up. I can log in using my ID & PW, then it spits out about a page and a half of data and stops at "checking battery source..."
    I can issue commands and it responds like a terminal, but I can't get out. It won't boot into the DESKTOP using any known escape keys, so I must assume it's waiting for me to initiate needed commands to control X which the instructions talk about but don't explain enough for me to navigate through. As I said, the architect assumes a familiarity I don't possess.
    Last edited by luckyshot; 10-14-2010 at 06:31 PM. Reason: mis-spelled word

  7. #16
    Linux Guru coopstah13's Avatar
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    run sudo Xorg -configure command to generate xorg.conf file, then backup old if it exists sudo mv /etc/X11/{xorg.conf,xorg.conf.orig} and then copy the new one in sudo mv xorg.conf.new /etc/X11

  8. #17
    Just Joined! luckyshot's Avatar
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    COMMAND LINE mode?

    Do I use those squiggly bars too? Are they a part of the code?
    Let me see if I'm getting this,OK? After re-booting the driver install for NVIDIA, system boots into a terminal, i sign in..use password, then;
    1) Back up old file @ sudo mv/etc/X11{xorg.conf,xorg.conf.orig}?
    Q: Where do I back it up to? higher functions are off-line, no CD, no printer, no access to HHD that I'm aware of, nor do I know the path to it even if I knew it were possible...?
    2) Run: sudo Xorg -configure
    3) Take the file it generates and copy/paste it into sudo mv xorg.conf.new/etc/X11
    Q: I don't know that I can even use copy/paste TOOLS on that level, and assuming I can do it another way...I don't know how to copy/paste files at the COMMAND LINE using whatever is used there to perform those tasks.

    This is what I'm getting from your post, if it's wrong then please correct me, thank you Coop !!
    Last edited by luckyshot; 10-15-2010 at 12:44 AM. Reason: more info...

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    Is there a chance that some of the install probs are from weak batteries..?

  10. #19
    Linux Guru coopstah13's Avatar
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    no, those are all commands in bold, and you need to execute them in that order, they all do exactly what I say they are doing

    for the record, i never said anything about copy/paste, its just copying file

    Code:
    sudo Xorg -configure
    sudo mv /etc/X11/{xorg.conf,xorg.conf.orig}
    sudo mv xorg.conf.new /etc/X11

  11. #20
    Just Joined! luckyshot's Avatar
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    About the Batteries....

    Quote Originally Posted by cosmicbrat View Post
    Is there a chance that some of the install probs are from weak batteries..?
    No. Not a laptop, it's a desktop with a 650W PS, and brand new quad-core mobo/w new bios batt.

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