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Suddenly I am unable to mount an ipod to my 10.04 distro. I get the error mount: can't find /dev/sdb2 in /etc/fstab or /etc/mtab Can see it in 'places' but ...
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  1. #1
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    cannot mount ipod


    Suddenly I am unable to mount an ipod to my 10.04 distro. I get the error
    mount: can't find /dev/sdb2 in /etc/fstab or /etc/mtab
    Can see it in 'places' but cannot mount and naturally, I cannot connect with GTKPod.
    I can successfully mount 2 other ipods on this box.
    Also, I can mount the original one ( the one I need ) to another machine.
    -keevill-

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Mounting block devices by device id is not usually recommended since changing your system can also change the id's. IE, /dev/sdb may become /dev/sdc or something else if you add a new drive (internal or external), or some other block device. Use the drive label in /etc/fstab instead.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rubberman View Post
    Mounting block devices by device id is not usually recommended since changing your system can also change the id's. IE, /dev/sdb may become /dev/sdc or something else if you add a new drive (internal or external), or some other block device. Use the drive label in /etc/fstab instead.
    Can you give me some more detailed help on exactly how to do that ?
    Thx,
    -keevill-

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    Just Joined! tyho's Avatar
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  5. #5
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tyho View Post
    True, but I prefer a drive/partition/file-system label since that way I can move stuff around, such as replacing the drive, and simply by giving the new device the same label it will be automatically found by the OS and mounted appropriately. Anyway, with the drive running and connected to the system, boot a live CD/DVD and from a command-line execute the command sudo fdisk -l and post the results back here.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rubberman View Post
    True, but I prefer a drive/partition/file-system label since that way I can move stuff around, such as replacing the drive, and simply by giving the new device the same label it will be automatically found by the OS and mounted appropriately. Anyway, with the drive running and connected to the system, boot a live CD/DVD and from a command-line execute the command sudo fdisk -l and post the results back here.
    Rubberman,

    Below is the results of fdisk -l when booting up in live cd.
    The first one is without the ipod connected and the lower one with it connected.
    -keevill-


    Code:
    ubuntu@ubuntu:~$ sudo fdisk -l
    
    Disk /dev/sda: 120.0 GB, 120034123776 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 14593 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0xafc9afc9
    
      Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sda1   *           1        6048    48580528+  83  Linux
    /dev/sda2            6352       14593    66203865    f  W95 Ext'd (LBA)
    /dev/sda5            6375       14593    66019086    7  HPFS/NTFS
    /dev/sda6            6353        6374      176683+  82  Linux swap / Solaris
    
    Partition table entries are not in disk order
    
    ____________________________________________________
    ubuntu@ubuntu:~$ sudo fdisk -l
    
    Disk /dev/sda: 120.0 GB, 120034123776 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 14593 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0xafc9afc9
    
      Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sda1   *           1        6048    48580528+  83  Linux
    /dev/sda2            6352       14593    66203865    f  W95 Ext'd (LBA)
    /dev/sda5            6375       14593    66019086    7  HPFS/NTFS
    /dev/sda6            6353        6374      176683+  82  Linux swap / Solaris
    
    Partition table entries are not in disk order
    Note: sector size is 2048 (not 512)
    
    Disk /dev/sdb: 30.0 GB, 30005821440 bytes
    255 heads, 62 sectors/track, 926 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 15810 * 2048 = 32378880 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 2048 bytes / 2048 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 2048 bytes / 2048 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x20202020
    
      Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sdb1               1           4       96264    0  Empty
    Partition 1 has different physical/logical beginnings (non-Linux?):
        phys=(0, 1, 1) logical=(0, 1, 2)
    Partition 1 has different physical/logical endings:
        phys=(2, 254, 63) logical=(3, 12, 21)
    Partition 1 does not end on cylinder boundary.
    Partition 1 does not start on physical sector boundary.
    /dev/sdb2               4         927    29206168    b  W95 FAT32
    Partition 2 has different physical/logical beginnings (non-Linux?):
        phys=(3, 0, 1) logical=(3, 12, 22)
    Partition 2 has different physical/logical endings:
        phys=(911, 254, 62) logical=(926, 180, 59)
    Partition 2 does not start on physical sector boundary.
    ubuntu@ubuntu:~$
    Last edited by MikeTbob; 10-22-2010 at 03:36 AM. Reason: Added code tags

  7. #7
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Thanks. The internal disc on the ipod has one user-accessible partition that I can see, /dev/sdb2 which is a FAT32 partition. Have you tried manually mounting it?

    1. Create a mount point, such as /mnt/ipod
    2. Mount /dev/sdb2 there: sudo mount -t vfat /dev/sdb2 /mnt/ipod

    If that works, then ok. If not, then it may be munged. The information from fdisk may be indicating that, but then I don't know what a normal ipod drive would look like - my wife won't let me touch hers!
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rubberman View Post
    Thanks. The internal disc on the ipod has one user-accessible partition that I can see, /dev/sdb2 which is a FAT32 partition. Have you tried manually mounting it?

    1. Create a mount point, such as /mnt/ipod
    2. Mount /dev/sdb2 there: sudo mount -t vfat /dev/sdb2 /mnt/ipod

    If that works, then ok. If not, then it may be munged. The information from fdisk may be indicating that, but then I don't know what a normal ipod drive would look like - my wife won't let me touch hers!
    That seemed to have done the trick Rubberman ! Initially I got the unable to mount error in gtkpod but on 2nd attempt it mounted and I can see the files on the ipod.

    However, when I try to copy songs over onto it I get the following error:

    error opening '/mnt/ipod/iPod_Control/Music/F18/libgpod649627.mp3 for writing (Permission denied).
    -keevill-

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    I managed to get over the permissions thing by using sudo gtkpod.
    I can live with this slight inconvenience.
    Thx for your help Rubberman.
    -keevill-

  10. #10
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Yeah. Mounting a FAT32 partition as root (sudo) will make it read-only for regular users. Sorry, forgot to mention that!
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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