Find the answer to your Linux question:
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
I think a recent update to 10.04 somehow has broken my installation. When I turn on the machine, it just sits at the splash screen with the white dots turning ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    53

    broken installation how can I repair without reinstalling


    I think a recent update to 10.04 somehow has broken my installation.
    When I turn on the machine, it just sits at the splash screen with the white dots turning orange from left to right as if it is going to boot up.
    I have tried letting it sit there but after half an hour it still remains the same.
    I have tried booting into recovery mode but that fails somewhere along the startup process.
    Is there a way to 'repair broken installation' when booting up with live cd ?
    I have been able to get to that option and I am trying to avoid doing a fresh install if possible.
    -keevill-

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    I can be found either 40 miles west of Chicago, in Chicago, or in a galaxy far, far away.
    Posts
    11,380
    By "update" I assume meant "upgrade"? You were running 9.10 or 9.04 before? Rule one of upgrading a functioning system - make a bit-image copy of the system disc and all user data BEFORE doing the upgrade. That way, if things go belly-up you can easily restore your entire system to its previous state. If you haven't done this, then I would recommend that you do this:

    1. Boot from live CD/DVD/USB
    2. Manually mount the hard drive partition(s).
    3. Backup all user and/or other critical data to external drive. This would include things like /etc/passwd, /etc/shadow, /etc/group, etc.
    4. Reinstall the system with the new version that you want to run.
    5. Reboot and reinstall optional applications.
    6. Reinstall user and other backed-up data.

    My personal system management processis are as follows:

    1. If only updating installed packages, kernel, etc. then just make sure that critical user data is backed up (optional). Usually this is safe since I can boot into the previous kernel version if necessary.
    2. If upgrading system to new release, then make a bit-image backup of the system disc to an external drive by booting into live CD/DVD/USB image and backing up the entire disc without mounting any of it. This has saved me on numerous occasions since if necessary I can restore the entire image in a much shorter period of time than manually trying to fix up stuff.
    3. I try to do a system image backup on a regular basis (every 2-4 weeks at most), running it (my 320GB system drive takes an hour or two) when I am not using the system for awhile. In fact, I'll do that today when I leave the house to go to a concert. I can set it to backup the data and then reboot back to the regular OS so when I get home, I will only need to log in.

    Trust me, this is cheap insurance, given the low cost of a decent sized external drive these days.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  3. #3
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    53
    Quote Originally Posted by Rubberman View Post
    By "update" I assume meant "upgrade"? You were running 9.10 or 9.04 before?
    Actually, I meant update in the sense of update manager came up with a bunch of updates for my 10.04 installation and thereafter, whether it was caused by carrying out these updates, my system won't start.
    I am trying to get it working without having to re-install all the other programs/settings etc.
    I assume that by re-installing the O/S that all my other programs will also have to be re-installed much like Windows.

    My data is safely backed up on another partition and on an external HDD.

    -keevill-

  4. #4
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Chandigarh, India
    Posts
    24,729
    Press Alt+Ctrl+F3. Does machine switch to command line mode?
    Does machine boot up in Recovery Mode?
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  5. #5
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    53
    Quote Originally Posted by devils casper View Post
    Press Alt+Ctrl+F3. Does machine switch to command line mode?
    Does machine boot up in Recovery Mode?
    At what point do I Press Alt+Ctrl+F3 ?
    Upon boot up ? if so, I just a blinking cursor - NOT command line.
    It won't boot up in recovery mode either. It gets so far and then halts
    -keevill-

  6. #6
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    53
    If this helps, when I try to boot into recovery mode, it moves along and fails after a few minutes with the error
    /bin/sh: can't access tty; job control turned off
    (initramfs)

    -keevill-

  7. #7
    Linux Guru rokytnji's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Desert
    Posts
    3,969
    Quote Originally Posted by keevill View Post
    If this helps, when I try to boot into recovery mode, it moves along and fails after a few minutes with the error
    /bin/sh: can't access tty; job control turned off
    (initramfs)

    -keevill-
    What preceded that error. example to show a complete error message below.

    Can not mount /dev/loop0 (/live/image//casper/filesystem.squashfs) on //filesystem.squashfs

    Busybox v1.15.3 (Debian 1:1.15.3-D built-in sheell (Ash)
    Enter 'help' for a list of built in commands

    /bin/sh: can't access tty; Job Control turned off
    Linux Registered User # 475019
    Lead,Follow, or get the heck out of the way. I Have a Masters in Raising Hell
    Tech Books
    Free Linux Books
    Newbie Guide
    Courses at Home

  8. #8
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    I can be found either 40 miles west of Chicago, in Chicago, or in a galaxy far, far away.
    Posts
    11,380
    Have you tried booting into the older kernel (assuming that the kernel was updated along with everything else)? Also, have you tried booting from a live CD/DVD to be sure that something in the hardware has not been munged, and your problem is only coincidental to the software update?
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  9. #9
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    53
    Quote Originally Posted by rokytnji View Post
    What preceded that error. example to show a complete error message below.
    BusyBox v1.13.3 ( Ubuntu 1:1.13.3-1ubuntu11) built-in shell (ssh) Enter 'help for a list of built in commands.

    Thx,
    -keevill-

  10. #10
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    53

    Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Rubberman View Post
    Have you tried booting into the older kernel (assuming that the kernel was updated along with everything else)? Also, have you tried booting from a live CD/DVD to be sure that something in the hardware has not been munged, and your problem is only coincidental to the software update?
    Well now .... I DID try several times to boot into 2 or 3 of the older kernels including their recovery modes but they did not work either.
    Before replying to your post, I tried one more time to boot into the last kernel and lo and behold, it worked.

    I got a disk checking routine then the machine booted up with error messages about a previous update which did not complete and offering to do a partial upgrade.

    I thought that I would ask advice here about this before doing anything which will break the installation again.
    I will not shut down or reboot the system until someone is kind enough to give me some advice regarding this.

    Many thx,
    -keevill-

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •