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Hello I have installed Ubuntu on a friends laptop. He lives in a different city, and needs to move files from one somewhat quirky 1tb drive to a new 1tb ...
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    Gui version of ddrescue for Ubuntu 10.1


    Hello I have installed Ubuntu on a friends laptop. He lives in a different city, and needs to move files from one somewhat quirky 1tb drive to a new 1tb drive. He needs something that reads slowly on purpose or something like that. He also needs a gui tool. He asked me, but I haven't been able to find something for Ubuntu. maybe a custom script for ddrescue would work, but i don't even think he would like that. He is very nervous when it comes to the terminal. Any help would be appreciated, thanks.

  2. #2
    oz
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    It doesn't have a GUI, but I've been using FSArchiver for archiving and transferring files and it's worked perfectly each time that I've used it:

    FSArchiver

    I usually run it from the Parted Magic LiveCD.

    Acronis makes a Linux version of their True Image software that runs from a live CD and it has a GUI, but you need to have a license to download and use it.
    oz

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    Thanks I wanted to confirm if this will work with dammaged drives. I forgot to mention that the drives are both usb external drives. Does this change anything? Also would kdiskrescue have a ubuntu version. I downloaded the one from their sight (Mandriva RPM) and converted it using alien, but after it installed, it kept asking for a libruby.so.1.8 I installed libruby1.8 but nothing changed.
    He really needs a gui app. Thanks though

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    oz
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pasha View Post
    Thanks I wanted to confirm if this will work with dammaged drives. I forgot to mention that the drives are both usb external drives. Does this change anything?
    I've not tried either of them with damaged or usb external drives so can't say for sure. Their websites might have some info on such features, though. If possible, I'd recommend running some tests with them to see how it goes before you totally commit to any certain application even if that means testing with a different set of drives.
    oz

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    Thanks ozar, but rescue was the primary objective, and my friend, whose harddrive we are talking about lives in a different city. I may try a custom script for his drive configuration and ddrescue. Thanks. I will post my results.

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    Oh dear....

    Quote Originally Posted by Pasha View Post
    Thanks ozar, but rescue was the primary objective, and my friend, whose harddrive we are talking about lives in a different city. I may try a custom script for his drive configuration and ddrescue. Thanks. I will post my results.
    This forum is somewhat old now, and I wonder whatever came of it. Pasha, can we get an update so that your generous contributors of information can know if they were helpful?

    I have to chime in here, though, to protect ......something. My sanity, if nothing else. I do this stuff on a regular basis, because I'm in the business of servicing computers.

    DATA RECOVERY IS NOT FOR AMATEURS. If someone is not comfortable with the command line, they should not be attempting a data recovery at all. This person is not going to follow a proper procedure for data recovery, and indeed is not capable of it, and will be very lucky indeed if they get a positive outcome. Pasha, do yourself AND your friend a favor and just do it for them.

    For those who care to know, here's how this SHOULD be done:

    1. The failing drive MUST be removed from its USB enclosure and put on a native (internal) IDE/SATA controller. USB controllers do not deal with errors very well, and will often lose their connection to the drive and/or hang the computer when read errors occur. Furthermore, USB enclosures are typically very hot, and you want to keep a failing drive as cool as possible. It would be ideal to place the failing hard drive on a hard, cool surface, like a tabletop, with a fan pointed at it, though this is not really necessary in most cases.

    2. ddrescue is the correct tool for the job. I have used many others, including Acronis, and they are incapable of the thorough scrubbing that ddrescue accomplishes. Furthermore, ddrescue can recover from a drive freak-out because it logs its progress. This is invaluable, but sometimes a bit of log manipulation is necessary to get a complete recovery from a very fudgy drive. The logfile must be saved to another device entirely which is neither the source, nor the destination. I use USB flash for this. Even in the case of very badly damaged hard drives it is rare for the logfile to exceed a few megabytes.

    3. The PartedMagic LiveCD is a good choice for this, or the System Rescue CD, although the SysRCD tends to have out-of-date versions of ddrescue, although for simple recoveries, they are little different. I have used both successfully.

    4. Here is a sample procedure:
    a. Boot PartedMagic without any USB devices attached. You may need to press F12, ESC, or some other key to get the boot menu to allow you to choose booting from CD. Launch LXTerminal from their equivalent of the Windows "Quick Launch" area.
    b. Type "ls /dev/sd*" to show what drives and partitions are detected. sda should be your internal first hard drive. This could be your primary hard drive, or the one you removed from your USB enclosure, if you removed the primary hard drive and replaced it with the ex-USB drive. Let's assume that it's not the one you removed from your USB enclosure, and that you added the ex-USB drive as a second hard drive. In that case, sdb is going to be your source (defective) drive.
    c. Now plug the target USB drive in. Wait 10 seconds, then type "ls /dev/sd*" again. Note that you should now have sdc in the list. This is the new USB drive, your destination.
    d. Now plug your USB flash drive in. Wait 10 seconds, then type "ls /dev/sd*" again. Note that you should now have sdd in the list. This is the USB flash drive to store the logfile on.
    e. Most likely you will have not only sdd but also sdd1 in the /dev listing. This is the partition that you need to mount to store the logfile. Type "mkdir /mnt/backup" then enter then "ntfs-3g /dev/sdd1 /mnt/backup" then enter and if that fails, then "mount /dev/sdd1 /mnt/backup" then enter. If the flash stick is formatted NTFS, the standard mount command can only mount it read-only. This is why you should try the ntfs-3g command first. If the stick is formatted FAT, ntfs-3g will warn you and fail, and then you will know that it's OK to use the standard mount command, which can both read and write to FAT partitions.
    f. In THIS CASE, THIS COMMAND WILL SAVE YOUR DATA. If ANYTHING in your situation is different, you MUST change some things or you will overwrite things you didn't mean to and ruin something. For the recovery scenario described in this scenario and my tutorial, this is correct. If you screw up your data....you've been warned. The next step is to type "ddrescue -d -v -r1 -f /dev/sdb /dev/sdc /mnt/backup/recovery.log" and press enter.
    g. Wait. ddrescue will give you progress reports along the way so you can see that things are happening, but it will seem painfully slow, especially in the damaged areas. Just copying a terabyte of data over USB can be time-consuming, even without a damaged drive to contend with. Patience is of the essence.
    h. If no drive freak-outs occur, when ddrescue says it is finished, you should see a small amount of data in the error size field and a massive amount in the data rescued field. If this is not the case, something went wrong, and I don't have time to describe how to fix it.

    I post these instructions for two reasons. First, I hope to frighten people who should not be attempting data recovery themselves into letting someone more knowledgeable do it. If the data isn't really important, and no other important data exists on the recovery computer, sure, take a whack at it, but more than likely a non-technical person will ruin something attempting a data recovery. Second, I hope that someone who is technical but has yet to discover the wonder of ddrescue and is still using dd will see the light that this is a wonderful tool and start taking advantage of it.
    rokytnji likes this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SilverPuppy View Post
    This forum is somewhat old now, and I wonder whatever came of it. Pasha, can we get an update so that your generous contributors of information can know if they were helpful?

    I have to chime in here, though, to protect ......something. My sanity, if nothing else. I do this stuff on a regular basis, because I'm in the business of servicing computers.

    DATA RECOVERY IS NOT FOR AMATEURS. If someone is not comfortable with the command line, they should not be attempting a data recovery at all. This person is not going to follow a proper procedure for data recovery, and indeed is not capable of it, and will be very lucky indeed if they get a positive outcome. Pasha, do yourself AND your friend a favor and just do it for them.

    For those who care to know, here's how this SHOULD be done:

    1. The failing drive MUST be removed from its USB enclosure and put on a native (internal) IDE/SATA controller. USB controllers do not deal with errors very well, and will often lose their connection to the drive and/or hang the computer when read errors occur. Furthermore, USB enclosures are typically very hot, and you want to keep a failing drive as cool as possible. It would be ideal to place the failing hard drive on a hard, cool surface, like a tabletop, with a fan pointed at it, though this is not really necessary in most cases.

    2. ddrescue is the correct tool for the job. I have used many others, including Acronis, and they are incapable of the thorough scrubbing that ddrescue accomplishes. Furthermore, ddrescue can recover from a drive freak-out because it logs its progress. This is invaluable, but sometimes a bit of log manipulation is necessary to get a complete recovery from a very fudgy drive. The logfile must be saved to another device entirely which is neither the source, nor the destination. I use USB flash for this. Even in the case of very badly damaged hard drives it is rare for the logfile to exceed a few megabytes.

    3. The PartedMagic LiveCD is a good choice for this, or the System Rescue CD, although the SysRCD tends to have out-of-date versions of ddrescue, although for simple recoveries, they are little different. I have used both successfully.

    4. Here is a sample procedure:
    a. Boot PartedMagic without any USB devices attached. You may need to press F12, ESC, or some other key to get the boot menu to allow you to choose booting from CD. Launch LXTerminal from their equivalent of the Windows "Quick Launch" area.
    b. Type "ls /dev/sd*" to show what drives and partitions are detected. sda should be your internal first hard drive. This could be your primary hard drive, or the one you removed from your USB enclosure, if you removed the primary hard drive and replaced it with the ex-USB drive. Let's assume that it's not the one you removed from your USB enclosure, and that you added the ex-USB drive as a second hard drive. In that case, sdb is going to be your source (defective) drive.
    c. Now plug the target USB drive in. Wait 10 seconds, then type "ls /dev/sd*" again. Note that you should now have sdc in the list. This is the new USB drive, your destination.
    d. Now plug your USB flash drive in. Wait 10 seconds, then type "ls /dev/sd*" again. Note that you should now have sdd in the list. This is the USB flash drive to store the logfile on.
    e. Most likely you will have not only sdd but also sdd1 in the /dev listing. This is the partition that you need to mount to store the logfile. Type "mkdir /mnt/backup" then enter then "ntfs-3g /dev/sdd1 /mnt/backup" then enter and if that fails, then "mount /dev/sdd1 /mnt/backup" then enter. If the flash stick is formatted NTFS, the standard mount command can only mount it read-only. This is why you should try the ntfs-3g command first. If the stick is formatted FAT, ntfs-3g will warn you and fail, and then you will know that it's OK to use the standard mount command, which can both read and write to FAT partitions.
    f. In THIS CASE, THIS COMMAND WILL SAVE YOUR DATA. If ANYTHING in your situation is different, you MUST change some things or you will overwrite things you didn't mean to and ruin something. For the recovery scenario described in this scenario and my tutorial, this is correct. If you screw up your data....you've been warned. The next step is to type "ddrescue -d -v -r1 -f /dev/sdb /dev/sdc /mnt/backup/recovery.log" and press enter.
    g. Wait. ddrescue will give you progress reports along the way so you can see that things are happening, but it will seem painfully slow, especially in the damaged areas. Just copying a terabyte of data over USB can be time-consuming, even without a damaged drive to contend with. Patience is of the essence.
    h. If no drive freak-outs occur, when ddrescue says it is finished, you should see a small amount of data in the error size field and a massive amount in the data rescued field. If this is not the case, something went wrong, and I don't have time to describe how to fix it.

    I post these instructions for two reasons. First, I hope to frighten people who should not be attempting data recovery themselves into letting someone more knowledgeable do it. If the data isn't really important, and no other important data exists on the recovery computer, sure, take a whack at it, but more than likely a non-technical person will ruin something attempting a data recovery. Second, I hope that someone who is technical but has yet to discover the wonder of ddrescue and is still using dd will see the light that this is a wonderful tool and start taking advantage of it.
    what does -f stands for, i can't use it

  8. #8
    oz
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    Quote Originally Posted by brislingf View Post
    what does -f stands for, i can't use it
    Hello and welcome!

    You can find a copy of the ddrescue manpage here:

    ddrescue(1): data recovery tool - Linux man page

    This thread is over a year old so I'm going to close it, but don't hesitate to start new threads of your own if you are having any issues with Linux.
    oz

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