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  1. #11

    Quote Originally Posted by rokytnji View Post
    How about posting the .bashrc file so members can see what is what. Where are you getting these entries from would help also. (just a partial link, put a space between ht tp so it can post since you are a new member).

    I am assuming the file you are editing sits in ~/.bashrc (~ means /home )
    Yes that's where the file sits.

    I am simply adding the following two lines to the very end of the file:

    xmodmap -e "keycode 108 = Prior"
    xmodmap -e "keycode 135 = Next"

    I have also tried:
    xmodmap -e 'keycode 108 = Prior'
    xmodmap -e 'keycode 135 = Next'

    I am getting the "idea" from this site:
    w w w . ehow.com/how_2180748_command-linux-swap-keyboard-keys.html

  2. #12
    How to Use the XMODMAP Command in Linux to Swap Keyboard Keys | eHow.com

    This site?

    Next you will need to add the xmodmap commands to the end of the file. For example, if you would like to switch the user's "a" key with the "s" key, and the keycode list showed A=73 and S=91, then you would add these commands to the file:
    Xmodmap -e 'keycode 91 = a A'
    Xmodmap -e 'keycode 73 = s S'
    is what I read there. I am not enough of a coder to know if your custom commands that differ from the site are correct. Maybe some other member who codes can step in and see where your syntax may be wrong.
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  3. #13
    Lubuntu is a bit different then the main stream 'Buntus.
    And because of the way it's set up, keybindings may be buggy.
    That being said try this;

    Check the rc.xml file found in this path;
    /home/<user>/.config/openbox/lxde-rc.xml

    Try editing it and then check to see if it works.
    You may have to reconfigure open box after making changes.
    To do that run the following command;
    openbox --reconfigure

    If it doesn't work after that check the same directory for this file;
    ubuntu-rc

    If you have that file then make the same changes to it.
    Then run the reconfigure command and test.

    To check key bindings press CTRL ALT (letter) T all at the same time to bring up terminal window and run this command;

    grep -A 2 "<keybind" ~/.config/openbox/lubuntu-rc.xml

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  5. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by TaZMAniac View Post
    Lubuntu is a bit different then the main stream 'Buntus.
    And because of the way it's set up, keybindings may be buggy.
    That being said try this;

    Check the rc.xml file found in this path;
    /home/<user>/.config/openbox/lxde-rc.xml

    Try editing it and then check to see if it works.
    You may have to reconfigure open box after making changes.
    To do that run the following command;
    openbox --reconfigure

    If it doesn't work after that check the same directory for this file;
    ubuntu-rc ...
    Thanks Taz for helping out.
    /home/<user>/.config/openbox/lxde-rc.xml
    In my case the lxde-rc.xml file is called lubuntu-rc.xml

    I checked it to make the edit.
    It has its own language/syntax and I don't know the syntax to get at the keys I want to change.

    ubuntu-rc isn't in the directory it's the file I mentioned above.


    Look, can we please do a RESET for this entire discussion?

    I have tried making changes to .bashrc to no avail.
    I have tried making changes to .profile to no avail.
    I have created .xmodmap and .xmodmaprc with the xmodmap commands inside them to no avail.
    I have INSTALLED lubuntu onto my c: drive, wiping out my WinXP just to get the two keys to work, to no avail.


    It's very simple.

    The following two commands with the exact syntax shown below
    WORK at the COMMAND LINE:

    xmodmap -e "keycode 108 = Prior"
    xmodmap -e "keycode 135 = Next"

    They change two keys, Alt_R changes to PgUp (Prior)
    and Menu key changes to PgDn (Next)

    Can anyone here please tell me how to have these two simple commands load AUTOMATICALLY each time Lubuntu starts up?

    I'm crying....

  6. #15
    Administrator MikeTbob's Avatar
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    Don't cry buddy. We're trying to help ya. I personally have never needed to use xmodmap or set any keys differently so I don't have a whole lot of insight into the problem here. I guess you'll have to wait until a Lubuntu Master shows up around here to solve this for you. Is there any way you can try a different distro? Not all distros are alike and most handle things their own way.
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  7. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeTbob View Post
    Don't cry buddy. We're trying to help ya. I personally have never needed to use xmodmap or set any keys differently so I don't have a whole lot of insight into the problem here. I guess you'll have to wait until a Lubuntu Master shows up around here to solve this for you. Is there any way you can try a different distro? Not all distros are alike and most handle things their own way.
    Sure I could try a different distro.
    I only tried Lubuntu because it was recently recommended on the EeePc forum.

    However...

    I'm not about to jump around trying different distro's to see if they will allow me to re-map these two keys!

    A long time ago when I had lots of time to kill, I used to mess around with DOS and Windows, and Excel macros and this and that.
    I wasted A LOT of time on that sort of thing.

    I don't have the time or inclination to go that route now.

    This has been an eye-opener so far re: the Linux world.
    I had heard about Linux for many years now but never actually tried it before.

    I knew it could get very technical (if one wanted to). I knew it had many features that you could tinker with. I knew that it was open-source, a very good concept.
    I knew it had a relatively small user base compared to the Windows/Mac universe.

    That was the extent of it.

    The only reason I am trying it now is because of a netbook I have.
    WinXP was starting to give me problems on it.
    It's a netbook that I use essentially for traveling (not too often).

    The only key apps needed are Web browsing, e-mail, Skype, etc. the usual stuff.
    I figured Linux should be able to cover those bases quite easily (the netbook actually ships with Linux, I asked the retailer to install WinXp instead).

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