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G'Day Rubberman; It doesn't install Ubuntu on a virtual disc, it's installed on it's own partition on the second HDD, when you use Wubi you get the option but I ...
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  1. #11
    Just Joined! Miykel's Avatar
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    G'Day Rubberman; It doesn't install Ubuntu on a virtual disc, it's installed on it's own partition on the second HDD, when you use Wubi you get the option but I always install it on it's own partition, it seems to install some kind of program on the partition then you have to reboot, select Ubuntu in the boot loader and then the install continues until the GUI launches. When I blow it and have to reinstall I just go into W7 and use easeuse to delete the partition and recreate, execute Wubi and start again, takes about 10 minutes, very handy when you are just starting out.
    Regards Miykel

  2. #12
    Linux Engineer Kloschüssel's Avatar
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    Good morning everyone,

    So I just learned something new. Looks like wubi emulates the hard disk as a writeable loop device which is just fine. But back to topic: would you please execute:

    # fdisk -l

    This has to be done as superuser (root or sudo).

    PS: I'll always write commands to be executed in a shell either starting with $ or #. $ refers to normal user, # to superuser. This is kind of standard, as your shell also should display these chars. You may find that notion across several other forums and howtos.

    Greetings,
    D.

  3. #13
    Just Joined! Miykel's Avatar
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    G'Day Kloschussel, thanks for the info re $ & #, every bit helps when all is new.
    Here is the fdisk;
    miykel@ubuntu:~$ sudo fdisk -l
    [sudo] password for miykel:

    Disk /dev/sda: 640.1 GB, 640135028736 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 77825 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x86a386a3

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sda1 * 1 13 102400 7 HPFS/NTFS
    Partition 1 does not end on cylinder boundary.
    /dev/sda2 14 77825 625023472+ f W95 Ext'd (LBA)
    Partition 2 does not end on cylinder boundary.
    /dev/sda5 14 12748 102286768+ 7 HPFS/NTFS
    /dev/sda6 12749 44847 257835186 7 HPFS/NTFS
    /dev/sda7 44848 77825 264895753+ 7 HPFS/NTFS

    Disk /dev/sdb: 500.1 GB, 500107862016 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 60801 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x875f49f0

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sdb1 1 12803 102838272 7 HPFS/NTFS
    /dev/sdb2 12804 60801 385543935 f W95 Ext'd (LBA)
    /dev/sdb5 12804 53290 325211796 7 HPFS/NTFS
    /dev/sdb6 53291 60801 60332076 7 HPFS/NTFS
    miykel@ubuntu:~$
    Regards Miykel

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  5. #14
    Linux Engineer Kloschüssel's Avatar
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    Alright. I think it's time to come back to the initial question of this thread.

    I do a lot of stuff with DVDs and I continually get "low disc space" warnings
    You should familiarize yourself with the linux way of mounting drives. See: Mounting definition by The Linux Information Project

    Generally said every physical or virtual drive can be mounted on every directory node of your linux installation and fdisk -l shows you all those mountpoints.

    The most interesting ones for you are these:

    /dev/loop0 17G 5.6G 9.8G 37% /
    /dev/sda5 98G 18G 81G 18% /host

    The essentials of this mean that the overall linux system lives in /, stored on /dev/loop0. /dev/loop0 has a total of 17GB and you're using 5.6GB of it. Every file below /host is stored physically on /dev/sda5, an NTFS partition from the first disk.

    So, even if you have lots of room on both of your hard drives, linux can use only as much as those mount points define. Generally linux won't use the /host mountpoint and thus your free space is limited to 9.8GB. Whenever you copy a DVD of, let's say, 4GB you run out of space at the third DVD unless you make room by moving them somewhere below /host. Note that also temporary files are stored below / and not /host, and thus they also "drain" your resources.

    I'm not familiar with that executable thingy you mentioned, but you may want to consider to either:

    * increase the size of /
    * work with data below /host
    * mount a bigger drive where it makes sense, i.e. such that /home is physically stored within a big separate partition

    Usually I mount a big harddrive (or raid array of drives) to /var/data and store files there as historically /var should store variable data files. See: Filesystem Hierarchy Standard

    Hope that helps to clarify some things. Feel free to ask more questions if you feel you have to.

  6. #15
    Just Joined! Miykel's Avatar
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    G'Day Kloschussel, Thanks for the help, it will take a while to digest everything you posted, to get a better handle on it all I booted into W7 and had a look at the disc layout with easeuse partition manager, only because I'm more familiar with that layout, by the size of the partitions in the fdisk log and the layout of the discs it seems the loop0 /dev/loop0 17G 5.6G 9.8G 37% / is the little partition, showing up as 10Gb, created during the install process which contains the boot info, called "System Reserve" , Ubuntu is actually installed on a 100Gb partition which is why I am having difficulty understanding why the low disc space warnings .
    Thanks again for the time you took to help.
    As my confidence increases the more I like this Ubuntu system, I might put another HDD into the PC and install a different Linux system, later though.
    Kind Regards Miykel

  7. #16
    Just Joined! newyorkpaulie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miykel View Post
    G'Day Kloschussel; Wubi.exe is a program which installs Ubuntu on the selected partition from Windows, instead of using a disc from DOS, it's very simple and easy.

    is there more to the fdisk -l command ?, when I tried to execute it I got :

    miykel@ubuntu:~$ fdisk -l
    miykel@ubuntu:~$

    What does loop0 mean, if you could explain please.
    Regards Miykel
    Try "sudo fdisk -l"

  8. #17
    Just Joined! Miykel's Avatar
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    G'Day Newyorkpaulie thanks for the reply,
    I did eventually run the command as root, see 4 up, however as thing went I had to reload the whole thing, trying to load nVidia drivers, and I noticed in the Wubi menu is the oportunity to dictate how big the install is, so I went for 30Gb which gave me larger files, as opposed to the default size of 18Gb.
    BUT, there's always a but, this morning I went to boot into Ubuntu but no good I get to a screen GNU GRUB Version etc. etc., but no grub boot options, so it looks like I have to start again. (Damn)
    Kind Regards Miykel

  9. #18
    Linux Newbie glene77is's Avatar
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    Miykel,

    IMHO, it is time to try the install from a Live-CD.
    WUBI is introducing a level of complexity which is interesting,
    but is un-necessary.
    I suggest, you simplify things and do the standard install
    as a side-by-side XP & Ubuntu dual partition.

    You mentioned 'install a different Linux system.'
    I have used a number of systems, and Ubuntu has good development.
    I have tried others, but return to a combo of XP & Ubuntu.
    I seldom startup the XP. Almost everything productive is done on Ubuntu.

    I like Puppy because it runs from a Live-CD and allows a partial frugal install, which in minimally invasive on your HD system (such as XP on the HD). Runs fine on a slow, old computer, with 512MB ram.
    Will run, even when HD is sent out for repairs,
    just no persistent storage until you burn a CD (storage) or replace the HD.

    When I travel, I use Puppy 525 on USB stick.
    Really nice to have Puppy in 4Gig and also 4G storage
    on a single USB flash drive. Works fine even when the HD is unplugged.

    Buena Suerte,
    glene77is

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