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I have Ubuntu Linux on my laptop. Not a fancy one, but a Gateway our school got rid of when they bought IPads for the teachers. Now, I am good ...
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  1. #1
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    Operating system not found?!


    I have Ubuntu Linux on my laptop. Not a fancy one, but a Gateway our school got rid of when they bought IPads for the teachers.

    Now, I am good on Windows, little knowledge of Linux. It hung the other day for several minutes, so I just shut it down, left it a few minutes, then restarted. Now I get this message:

    PXE-E62: Media test failure, check cable
    PXE-MOF: Exiting Intel Boot Gent.
    Operating system not found.



    Confused doesn't begin to explain what I am right now. I assumed that the simplest thing to do would be to reinstall it. When I try that, it tells me that I don't have enough disk space.

    When I start it up, I press F10 to go to the boot menu.

    I have a CD-Rom to install it. It asks me if I want to setup from CD, I click yes...and I get the same stinkin' message as above.

    Can someone help me thru this before I pull out my lovely blonde hair? And please, use little words. Like I said, I am considered a power user on Windows, but wanted Linux on the laptop......

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Sounds like the disc is going belly-up...

    Disc drives develop bad sectors. Most modern drives have some number of spare sectors, and when they find a bad one developing in use, the hardware maps the data to a spare, and stops using the bad one. After some time, all the spares get used, so the bad sectors start multiplying. This is when you need to replace the drive. You can get some more use out of it by doing this:

    1. Boot with a live/recovery CD/DVD.
    2. Run 'fsck -c -f' on the system drive partitions.. This will scan for bad blocks, map them out of use by the file system, and try to recover as much data as possible. You may lose some data.
    3. Reboot.

    If after rebooting you cannot access the system, then you will need to go further in order to recover your data files, and reinstall the system.

    BTW, what version of Ubuntu was your system running?
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  3. #3
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    I'm sorry. Ubuntu 10.01 I believe

  4. #4
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Susancnw View Post
    I'm sorry. Ubuntu 10.01 I believe
    Well, it is probably either 10.04 or 10.10. There is no Ubuntu 10.01 release...
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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