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Does anybody know anything about "Deactivate Getty"? It's a package you can get from "Ailurus", the program Ailurus itself is pretty cool actually and does & tells you quite a ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Newbie SunshineFolk's Avatar
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    Deactivate Getty


    Does anybody know anything about "Deactivate Getty"?

    It's a package you can get from "Ailurus", the program Ailurus itself is pretty cool actually and does & tells you quite a bit of stuff for your system.

    Basically "Deactivate Getty" supposedly speeds up the Linux start up process by freeing up 2.5 MBytes of memory.

    Does Getty do anything that I would really need to be started with "startup"?
    I'd hate to download this in hopes it speeds up boot, and it mess something up.

    Anybody know or have any input on this?
    Thanks



    SunshineFolk

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    Well, getty is the general name for the program that sets up the Linux virtual consoles on your machine (get TTY, see!). Usually it sets up 6 of them and then starts your gui on console 7. Virtual consoles are just the same as xterms only they run full-screen, independently of X. Some people find them easier to read.

    If you never use virtual consoles, there's no reason why you should waste memory running them. But I'm surprised that there's a package for getting rid of them; you could do that yourself simply by removing the getty launch instructions from /etc/inittab.
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"
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  3. #3
    Linux Newbie SunshineFolk's Avatar
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    OK, thanks for the info.

    But let me get this straight. If I'm not using a virtual console, it wont matter if I have getty boot up? Do you mean by a virtual console something like for games? Or could VMware or virtual box be considered a virtual console?

    I'm not using anything for games, but I do plan to use VMware or Virtual Box to play around with some other OS/distros. But if I was to get rid of it, would it simply run itself if something needed it to do something with? Like instead of running on boot, it would be executed when a program or "virtual console" was to open? (I realize it would take a little longer if this is the case)

    I have a dual-monitor set up too. Just adding that, if it somehow is linked.

    Oh, and when I tty terminal I get:
    Code:
    $ tty
    /dev/pts/1
    Does this mean I'm using it? Or simply it's just in this place if I was to use it?

    Sorry for all the questions, I'm just trying to make sure it won't be needed WHEN I disable it

    Thanks!


    SunshineFolk

  4. #4
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SunshineFolk View Post
    OK, thanks for the info.

    But let me get this straight. If I'm not using a virtual console, it wont matter if I have getty boot up? Do you mean by a virtual console something like for games? Or could VMware or virtual box be considered a virtual console?
    Certainly not! "Console" in this context means a terminal; it has nothing to do with gaming consoles. It's a "virtual console" because you can have several of them all mapping to the same screen and keyboard. And virtualbox is a virtual OS, not a virtual console.

    Oh, and when I tty terminal I get:
    Code:
    $ tty
    /dev/pts/1
    Does this mean I'm using it? Or simply it's just in this place if I was to use it?
    No. That's a graphical terminal (often called an xterm). It does exactly the same job as a virtual console but it opens on your graphical desktop, not independently of it. All xterms have names of the /dev/pts form. Virtual consoles have names like /dev/tty1

    If you want to see a Linux virtual console, press ctrl-alt-f1. You'll see a black screen with a login prompt. Enter your name and password and you're in. To log in at other virtual consoles and switch between them, use alt-f2, alt-f3 and so on. alt-f7 should get you back to your desktop.
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"
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  5. #5
    Linux Newbie SunshineFolk's Avatar
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    If you want to see a Linux virtual console, press ctrl-alt-f1. You'll see a black screen with a login prompt. Enter your name and password and you're in. To log in at other virtual consoles and switch between them, use alt-f2, alt-f3 and so on. alt-f7 should get you back to your desktop.
    This really helped me get the point here. Thanks for this detailed help. But, one more question. I have used that before, but it was when I messed up my display settings and when I would log in, it would place my screen all the way off my monitors (messed it up with NVIDIA, but I'm good now). I had to log into this terminal from the log-in screen though, not once I was in. I hadn't realized you could do that from here until you said that.

    To my question. If I were to disable that, would it mean I could never EVER use it? Or it would simply take some time to load it up, rather than having it on standby?


    SunshineFolk

  6. #6
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SunshineFolk View Post
    To my question. If I were to disable that, would it mean I could never EVER use it? Or it would simply take some time to load it up, rather than having it on standby?
    I think virtual consoles have to be created at boot or you don't have any. Here is the section of my /etc/inittab file that creates them (yours will be very similar):
    Code:
    c1:2:respawn:/sbin/agetty 38400 tty1 linux
    c2:2:respawn:/sbin/agetty 38400 tty2 linux
    c3:2:respawn:/sbin/agetty 38400 tty3 linux
    c4:2:respawn:/sbin/agetty 38400 tty4 linux
    c5:2:respawn:/sbin/agetty 38400 tty5 linux
    c6:2:respawn:/sbin/agetty 38400 tty6 linux
    You can prevent them from starting by commenting out those lines and then rebooting. But you'd have to reverse the procedure to get them back again.
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"
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  7. #7
    Linux Newbie SunshineFolk's Avatar
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    Thank you Thank you.
    SunshineFolk

    Don't fix it if it ain't broken, and don't break it if you can't fix it.
    127.0.0.1 sweet 127.0.0.1...
    When you see pigs fly it means Window$ has become open source.

  8. #8
    Linux Newbie SunshineFolk's Avatar
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    I would mark this [SOLVED] but I can't seem to locate the solved button anymore with this new layout it's not in the same place apparently
    SunshineFolk

    Don't fix it if it ain't broken, and don't break it if you can't fix it.
    127.0.0.1 sweet 127.0.0.1...
    When you see pigs fly it means Window$ has become open source.

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